Traffic Sound: Peruvian Protest Psychedelia

Traffic Sound i i

hide captionTraffic Sound

courtesy of the artist
Traffic Sound

Traffic Sound

courtesy of the artist

English / Spanish

In early 1970s Peru, a thick ideological line designated what was "national" and what was "foreign." A military junta had recently come to power, bent on remaking the nation in its image. Constitutional protections were suspended. But for the first time, the nation's long-repressed indigenous groups were given land rights and cultural recognition. Rockers were caught in the crosshairs of a fraught ideological battleground. Such were the historical forces that shaped Traffic Sound, arguably Peru's most important progressive rock band of the era.

Traffic Sound had its origins in the breakup at the end of 1967 of one of the more popular cover bands of the period, Los Hang Ten's. Manuel Sanguinetti, lead singer for Los Hang Ten's, brought with him two other members of the band along with ex-members of another well-known group, Los Mads. They were now a supergroup and one of the favored bands at Lima's "temple of Peruvian psychedelia," the Tiffany Club, where their repertoire consisted of English-language covers of The Doors, Cream and Jimi Hendrix. Still, the songs were good enough to be released as singles and then as a compilation LP, A Bailar Go-Go, in the fall of 1968 on Peru's premier record label, MAG.

Then that October came the coup. Musical venues were shut down. Radio stations were discouraged from disseminating all forms of rock, especially locally produced rock. Many groups simply disbanded. Yet Traffic Sound forged ahead. They shelved the covers that had launched their career and dedicated themselves to writing and recording original music. But the band had little interest in toeing the official line of indigenous cultural nationalism. Despite or perhaps because of the ideological forces at play, the period of 1969-73 is recalled as the heyday of progressive rock in Peru.

Revolutionary groups, inspired by events in Cuba, were afoot. But the coup leadership paradoxically took inspiration as much from Cuba as from neighboring Brazil and Argentina, where right-wing militaries had recently seized control. Peru's new junta aimed to co-opt the revolutionary left. It did so by implementing its own top-down radical economic and social program. Lima's bustling, consumer-driven rock scene became a casualty of the military's left-wing agenda.

In January 1970, MAG released Traffic Sound's Virgin, the first Peruvian rock album made up entirely of original compositions. Every song on the album was written in English. Moreover, aside from some subtle conga drumming, the obvious musical references were to Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, The Beatles and other progressive rock groups of the era, not to the "Andean Folkloric" sounds being promoted by the regime and the nation's intellectuals. This seeming turn away from Peru's cultural heritage shared much in common with Mexico's La Onda Chicana of the same period (subject for a future post), where most of the bands wrote original compositions in English. And it was in stark contrast with groups such as Los Jaivas in Chile, which explicitly sought to create a fusion of rock and indigenous music.

One song in particular from Virgin, "Meshkalina" (Mescaline) vaulted Traffic Sound to international stardom. Backed by a psychedelic-laden funk beat, the song's lyrics playfully managed to mock the regime's one-note cultural nationalism while furtively celebrating an indigenous drug counterculture. "Yawar Huaca [an early Incan ruler] wondered why he was high once/ . . . Spread the weed one day, all over his empire/. . . He said 'Man it's here, let's try my new substance/Give me some meshkalina/Give me some meshkalina.'" (Meshkalina is a reference to the "Peruvian Torch" cactus found in the highlands of Peru and known for its hallucinogenic properties.)

YouTube

The last song on the album is an instrumental piece titled simply "Last Song." A beautiful elegy, it offers a window into the soul-searching that wracked the youth of this generation, buffeted as they were by competing and often contradictory ideological calls to arms:

YouTube

In May 1970, a major earthquake struck northern Peru, killing nearly 80,000 people and leaving more than 500,000 homeless. The regime was shaken as well. Carlos Santana arrived to play a series of benefit concert and was met by more than 3,000 fans at the airport. Two days before a concert at the massive stadium at San Marcos University, the stage mysteriously burned down. The university's left-wing student organization had denounced the event as "an imperialist invasion." The junta concurred. Santana and his band were ejected from the country, accused by the regime of "acting contrary to good taste and the moralizing objectives of the revolutionary government."

Yet Traffic Sound remained prodigious in their output. That same year they recorded a second original LP, Traffic Sound. The songs reflected an experimental integration of Latin percussion and Andean-inspired woodwinds. Still, the band's strength was its "international" psychedelic sound. English remained the language of choice.

Soon after that they were contracted by Braniff Airlines to promote the company's new line of 747s. As odd as it seems, contracting Traffic Sound actually made some sense: The company had already embraced a daring marketing strategy of wrapping their planes in brilliant Pop Art colors. With Braniff as their sponsor, Traffic Sound took their music to Chile, Argentina and Brazil in 1971, representing a very different image abroad of "revolutionary Peru."

Braniff Airlines i i

hide captionBraniff Airlines

courtesy of Braniff Airlines
Braniff Airlines

Braniff Airlines

courtesy of Braniff Airlines

Later that year, Traffic Sound released Lux. It would be their final LP. The album was more eclectic than previous projects and its mélange of genres is somewhat unsettling. Heavy metal-influenced riffs on one track are followed on the next by lighthearted música tropical. In that regard, it was a perfect reflection of a country — an entire generation — experiencing a profound uncertainty.

"To hell with your revolution" proclaims the opening line and refrain of the song "The Revolution." Peru's countercultural youth were caught in the middle. Better to live and let live. Another song from the album, "Survival," nicely captures the nostalgia for an era of comparative innocence, before the fear of military police in the streets and left-wing guerrillas in the mountains: "If you would like to live/If you would like to see/If you would like to breathe/You first must try to understand/That simple things are just enough/To find the loving kind/And see the brighter day/To live within ourselves":

YouTube

By early 1972, the band had decided to call it quits. In a fundamental sense, the break-up of Traffic Sound brought Peru's progressive rock era to a close. As elsewhere in Latin America, a dynamic rock scene had been cut short by a combination of government repression and left-wing abuse.

—————————————————————————————————

English / Spanish

La Historia Del Rock Latino: La Psicodélica Protesta Peruana

Traffic Sound i i

hide captionTraffic Sound

courtesy of the artist
Traffic Sound

Traffic Sound

courtesy of the artist

A principios de la década de 1970 en Perú, había una estricta división ideológica entre lo nacional y lo extranjero. Una junta militar había subido al poder, dedicada a reconstruir la identidad nacional. Las protecciones constitucionales fueron suspendidas. Pero por primera vez, los grupos indígenas, históricamente reprimidos, fueron otorgados tierra y reconocimiento cultural. De un día para el otro, los roqueros peruanos se encontraron en medio de una batalla ideológica. Estas fueron las fuerzas históricas que moldearon a Traffic Sound, una de las bandas mas importantes de del rock peruano de esta época.

Traffic Sound originó en 1967 con la ruptura de una de las bandas mas importantes de esa era, Los Hang Ten's, quienes se dedicaban a tocar covers. Manuel Sanguinetti, el líder vocalista de Los Hang Ten's, trajo con el a dos otros miembros de la banda, y también a ex integrantes de otra banda conocida, Los Mads. Así fue que se formó un súper grupo, una de las bandas favoritas que tocaban en el Tiffany Club, "el templo de la música psicodélica peruana." El repertorio de Traffic Sounds consistía en covers en inglés de The Doors, Cream and Jimi Hendrix. Aun así, las canciones eran lo suficientemente buenas como para ser publicadas por la discográfica más importante de Perú, MAG, primero como singles, y luego en un compilado LP llamado A Bailar A Go-Go, en el otoño de 1968.

En Octubre de ese año, ocurrió el golpe de estado. Los establecimientos de música fueron clausurados, y las estaciones de radio recibieron presión para no tocar más música de rock, especialmente rock producido en Perú. Dada la hostilidad, muchas bandas simplemente dejaron de tocar. Sin embargo, Traffic Sound siguió adelante. Dejaron de lado los covers que habían lanzado su carrera, y se dedicaron a escribir y a grabar sus propias composiciones. Pero la banda tenía poco interés en adherirse a la cultura oficial del nacionalismo indígena. A pesar de la batalla ideológica (o tal vez como resultado de esa batalla), el periodo entre 1969 y 1973 es reconocido como la época dorada del rock progresivo en Perú.

Por ese entonces los grupos revolucionarios peruanos, inspirados por los recientes eventos en Cuba, hervían. Pero paradójicamente, el nuevo gobierno peruano se inspiró tanto en los eventos en Cuba, como en los hechos ocurridos en países vecinos como Brasil y Argentina, donde grupos militares de derecha habían tomado el control. La junta militar buscó adoptar las ideas de la izquierda revolucionaria. Así fue que implementó sus propios programas económicos y sociales revolucionarios. La explosiva escena de rock limeño, cayó victima de la política izquierdista del gobierno militar peruano.

En Enero de 1970, MAG estrenó Virgin de Traffic Sound—el primer álbum de rock peruano que consistía completamente en canciones originales. Todas las canciones del álbum estaban escritas en inglés. Más aun, aparte de un sutil ritmo de conga, el álbum estaba fuertemente influenciado por Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, los Beatles, y otros grupos de rock progresivos de la era, y no los sonidos "folclóricos andinos" promovidos por el gobierno y los intelectuales. Este aparente rechazo de la herencia cultural peruana, se parecía mucho a La Onda Chicana en México, la cual ocurrió durante la misma época (hablaremos mas sobre este movimiento en el futuro), y también se trató de bandas nacionales escribiendo canciones en inglés. Era un fuerte contraste con grupos como Los Jaivas en Chile, quienes explícitamente buscaban crear una fusión entre el rock y la música indígena. Hay una canción en particular del álbum Virgin, llamada "Meshkalina", que lanzó a Traffic Sound al estrellato internacional. Construida sobre un tiempo de funk psicodélico, las letras de la canción logran burlarse del nacionalismo del gobierno militar, y a la vez celebran, furtivamente, la contracultura indígena de las drogas. "Yawar guaca [lider Inca] se preguntaba porque estaba volando/...un día esparció la yerba, por todo el imperio/...dijo "Hombre, aquí esta, probemos mi nueva substancia/Dame un poco de mezcalina/Dame un poco de Meshkalina." (Meshkalina se refiere al cactus que crece en los altos del Perú, conocido por sus propiedades alucinógenas).

YouTube

La última canción del disco es una pieza instrumental, simplemente titulada "Última Canción." Se trata de una bella elegía, y nos da una idea de la confusión espiritual que vivía la juventud peruana de esa generación, golpeada por ambas facciones de una guerra ideológica.

YouTube

En Mayo de 1970, un terrible terremoto ocurrió en el norte de Perú, matando a casi 80,000 personas, y dejando a mas de 500,000 sin hogar. El gobierno militar también se vio afectado. Carlos Santana llegó al país a tocar una serie de conciertos benéficos, y fue recibido por más de 3,000 fans en el aeropuerto. Las organizaciones estudiantiles de izquierda denunciaron al evento musical como parte de "la invasión imperialista." La junta militar estaba de acuerdo. Dos días antes del concierto en el masivo estadio de la Universidad de San Marcos, el escenario misteriosamente se incendió. Santana y su banda fueron expulsados del país, acusados por el régimen de "actuar en contra del buen gusto y de los objetivos morales del gobierno revolucionario peruano."

A pesar de todo esto, Traffic Sound continuó siendo una banda sumamente prolífica. Ese mismo año grabaron su segundo LP, Traffic Sound. Las canciones de este álbum integraban sonidos experimentales de percusión latina, e instrumentos Andinos. Sin embargo, el enfoque de la banda siguió siendo el sonido "internacional" psicodélico. Y el inglés siguió siendo el idioma de preferencia.

A poco de realizar su segundo LP, Traffic Sound fue contratado por Aerolíneas Braniff para promover los nuevos aviones 747. Puede parecer extraño contratar a una banda de rock para promover una línea de aviones, pero fue una jugada bien calculada: Braniff había implementado una atrevida estrategia de marketing al pintar sus aviones en llamativos colores psicodélicos, al estilo del arte pop. Con Braniff como sponsor, en 1971 Traffic Sounds logró llevar su música a Chile, Argentina y Brasil, proyectando así una imagen muy distinta del "Perú revolucionario."

Braniff Airlines i i

hide captionBraniff Airlines

courtesy of Braniff Airlines
Braniff Airlines

Braniff Airlines

courtesy of Braniff Airlines

Mas tarde ese año, Traffic Sounds publicó Lux, su último LP. Este álbum fue mas ecléctico que los previos proyectos de la banda, y su mezcla de géneros es algo desconcertante. Canciones con riffs inspirados en la música heavy metal coexisten con divertidas melodías tropicales. En ese aspecto, Lux refleja el clima que se vivía en Perú en 1971: Una generación entera vivía una inmensa incertidumbre y confusión.

"¡Al Diablo Con Tu Revolución!" comienza la canción "La Revolución." La contracultura de la juventud peruana estaba atrapada. Era mejor vivir, y dejar vivir. Otra canción de álbum "Supervivencia" es un retrato de nostalgia por la era de la inocencia; antes de que los corazones peruanos fuesen invadidos por el terror a la policía militar en las calles, y las guerrillas izquierdistas en los montes: "Si te gustaría vivir/Si te gustaría ver/Si te gustaría respirar/Primero debes tratar de entender/Que las cosas simples son lo único que importa/Para encontrar la gente llena de amor/Y ver un día mejor/Para vivir dentro de nosotros mismos."

YouTube

A principios de 1972, Traffic Sound se desbandó. La era del rock progresivo peruano había llegado a su fin. Así como en otras partes de America Latina, una dinámica escena del rock latino fue aplastada por la combinación de un gobierno represivo, y abusos de la izquierda política.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.