¡Que Miedo!: Terrifying Tales And Scary Songs From Latin America

A shot from the Day of the Dead festival last year in Los Angeles. As discussed in today's show the holiday is distinct from Halloween. i i

hide caption

A shot from the Day of the Dead festival last year in Los Angeles. As discussed in today's show the holiday is distinct from Halloween.

Rob Sheridan via Flickr
A shot from the Day of the Dead festival last year in Los Angeles. As discussed in today's show the holiday is distinct from Halloween.

A shot from the Day of the Dead festival last year in Los Angeles. As discussed in today's show the holiday is distinct from Halloween.

Rob Sheridan via Flickr

English / Spanish

When the dead are alone, they chat very pleasantly amongst themselves and tell each other things; they tell each other their stories. It must be very interesting to live inside a cemetery and hear how the dead tell each other things, their sorrows, their joys, everything.

— Cuban poet Eliseo Diego

One of my favorite books of all time, the scariest and most beautiful novel I've read, is Pedro Páramo by Mexican author Juan Rulfo. It's the story of Juan Preciado, who promises his dying mother to return to the Mexican town of Comala and meet his father, Pedro Páramo. When Juan arrives, he realizes it's literally a ghost town haunted by spirits who tell him the story of the abuses Pedro inflicted on all who knew him. The story is quite frightening, gorgeous and very sensual — three words which could be used to capture this week's Alt.Latino Halloween Special.

We start off in Mexico with a traditional song, "La Bruja" (The Witch), interpreted by Tlen-Huicani (which is Nahuatl for The Singers). It's ghostly, rich in imagery and eroticism, with lyrics like: The witch grabs me and takes me to the hills/she sits me on her legs and give me little kisses/oh tell me, tell me/you tell me/how many little creatures have you sucked up?/None! None! None, can't you see? I only intend to suck you up!!

Given such spooky circumstances, we're glad to be accompanied by guest ghost hunters Matt Barbot and Isabela Raygoza. Isabela is the music editor and Matt the city editor for one of our favorite online publications, Remezcla.com. They brought their extensive cultural knowledge and made a scary show lighthearted and fun.

We've got a lot of classics this week: Puerto Rican reggaeton duo Calle 13 is taking us straight to hell with their hit "Tango Del Pecado" (Tango Of Sin), Argentine rock gods Los Fabulosos Cadillacs shake us up with "Calaveras Y Diablitos" (Skulls And Little Devils). We also open the vault and feature Mexico's Fobia. Its song "El Diablo" (The Devil) was a little before my time, but I've had it stuck in my head all week.

As always we've got newcomers, too: "Diablo!" (Devil!) by Puerto Rico's Davila 666 is a hilarious tale of love gone terribly wrong. And Uruguayan singer-songwriter Guarco tells us all about the creatures that inhabit his head in the ballad "Monstruo" (Monster).

And we couldn't do without some of the legendary songs: Chavela Vargas sings "La Llorona" (The Weeping Woman) with raw and terrifying passion. And El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico does one of my favorite salsa songs, "La Muerte" (Death). It never ceases to fascinate me how salsa music inserts some of the most tragic topics (death, prison, heartbreak, deceit) into some of the most upbeat music you've ever heard.

Speaking of legends, we did something different this year. We've been asking you to send us your favorite scary stories from across Latin America, and sharing some of our own. Felix Contreras swears he has a friend who once saw El Chupacabra heading out to suck some blood. Listener David Angel Lindes from Guatemala was scared of the literal lady-killer El Sombrerón (The Big Hat Man). Isabela Raygoza thinks she might have heard La Llorona crying over her drowned children. And me? Well, let's just say I'm not going to be doing any midnight strolls across the Argentine pampas anytime soon for fear of running into La Luz Mala (The Evil Light).

These legends exist in a thousand versions. Sometimes La Llorona is an indigenous woman who fell in love with a Spaniard and gave him three children before he left her for a high-society Spanish woman. La Llorona drowned the children in despair, and her spirit still roams the Earth, looking for her kids and weeping. In other versions, she's a beautiful woman who drowned her kids because she was jealous of the amount of time her husband spent with them. One thing is for sure: It's a story told across the Spanish-speaking world, and when your parents tell you not to go out at night because La Llorona will snatch you, you get under the covers.

While you're under there crying like a terrified child, make sure to turn up this week's Alt.Latino. We're providing a stellar soundtrack to your worst nightmares!

¡Que Miedo! 11 Songs To Celebrate Halloween

La Bruja

  • Artist: Tlen Huicani
  • Album: Veracruz Son Y Huapango

Coming at you from: Xalapa, Mexico

close

Purchase Featured Music

  • "La Bruja"
  • Album: Veracruz Son Y Huapango
  • Artist: Tlen Huicani
YouTube
 

Witch

  • Artist: Dani Shivers
  • Album: El EP

Coming at you from: Tijuana, Mexico

YouTube
 

El Fantasma

  • Artist: Tijuana NO!
  • Album: Rock Milenium: Tijuana No!

Coming at you from: Tijuana, Mexico

Tijuana NO!'s MySpace

YouTube
 
Cover for Residente o Visitante

Tango del Pecado

  • Artist: Calle 13
  • Album: Residente o Visitante

Coming at you from: San Juan, Puerto Rico

Calle 13's Website

close

Purchase Featured Music

  • "Tango del Pecado"
  • Album: Residente o Visitante
  • Artist: Calle 13
  • Label: Sony BMG Latin
  • Released: 2007
YouTube
 
Cover for Tan Bajo

Diablo

  • Artist: Davila 666
  • Album: Tan Bajo

Coming at you from: San Juan, Puerto Rico

Sound like: They've described themselves as sounding like "Menudo on drugs"

Dávila 666's MySpace

close

Purchase Featured Music

  • "Diablo"
  • Album: Tan Bajo
  • Artist: Davila 666
  • Label: In the Red Records
  • Released: 2011
YouTube
 
Cover for Mil Siluetas

Lobo Hombre en Paris

  • Artist: La Union
  • Album: Mil Siluetas

Coming at you from: Madrid, Spain

close

Purchase Featured Music

  • "Lobo Hombre en Paris"
  • Album: Mil Siluetas
  • Artist: La Union
  • Label: WM Records
  • Released: 1984
YouTube
 
Cover for Mundo Feliz

Diablo

  • Artist: Fobia
  • Album: Mundo Feliz

Coming at you from: Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico

Fobia's MySpace

close

Purchase Featured Music

  • "Diablo"
  • Album: Mundo Feliz
  • Artist: Fobia
  • Label: BMG
  • Released: 1991
YouTube
 

Monster

  • Artist: Guarco
  • Album: Fiebre Latino

Coming at you from: Uruguay

More about Guarco

YouTube
 

Calaveras y Diablitos

  • Artist: Fabulosos Cadillacs
  • Album: Fabulosos Calavera

Coming at you from: Buenos Aires, Argentina

Fabulosos Cadillacs

close

Purchase Featured Music

  • "Calaveras y Diablitos"
  • Album: Fabulosos Calavera
  • Artist: Fabulosos Cadillacs
  • Released: 2097
YouTube
 

Llorona

  • Artist: Chavela Vargas
  • Album: Llorona

Coming at you from From: Costa Rica/Mexico

Chavela Vargas's Website

close

Purchase Featured Music

  • "Llorona"
  • Album: Llorona
  • Artist: Chavela Vargas
  • Label: WEA
  • Released: 2004
YouTube
 

Yo Soy La Muerte

  • Artist: El Gran Combo De Puerto Rico
  • Album: Yo Soy La Muerte

Coming at you from: Puerto Rico

El Gran Combo De Puerto Rico's Website

YouTube
 

———————————————————————————————————————-

English / Spanish

¡Que Miedo! 11 Canciones Para Noche De Brujas

Los muertos cuando están solos platican muy a gusto entre ellos y cuentan cosas; se cuentan unos a otros sus historias. Debe ser muy interesante vivir dentro de un cementerio y oír cómo los muertos se cuentan sus cosas, sus penas, sus alegrías, todo.

—- El poeta cubano Eliseo Diego

Uno de mis libros favoritos de todos los tiempos, la novela mas bella y espeluznante que he leído, es Pedro Páramo, del autor mexicano Juan Rulfo. Es la historia de Juan Preciado, un hombre que le promete a su madre moribunda volver al pueblo mexicano de Comala a conocer a su padre, Pedro Páramo. Cuando Juan llega, se da cuenta de que Comala se ha convertido en un pueblo fantasma, habitado por espíritus, y ellos le cuentan la historia de los abusos de Pedro. La historia es aterrorizadora, bella y muy sensual—tres palabras que podríamos usar para describir nuestro programa especial de Noche De Brujas- una fiesta que en Estados Unidos (y partes de México y Canadá) se celebra el 31 de Octubre.

Comenzamos el show en México con una canción tradicional, "La Bruja", interpretada por Tlen-Huicani (en Nahuatl eso significa Los Cantantes). Es una canción fantasmagórica, con una riqueza de imágenes y repleta de erotismo, con letras como: Me agarra la bruja/me lleva al cerrito/me sienta en sus piernas/me da de besitos /¿Ay dígame ay dígame ay dígame usted/cuantas creaturitas se ha chupado usted?/ninguna, ninguna, ninguna no ve/que ando en pretensions de chuparme a usted.

Esta semana también tenemos muchos clásicos: el duo puertorriqueño de reggaetón Calle 13 nos lleva directo al infierno con su éxito "Tango Del Pecado", y los dioses del rock argentino Los Fabulosos Cadillacs nos hacen mover el esqueleto con "Calaveras Y Diablitos". Ademas, saltamos en la maquina del tiempo y escuchamos una banda Mexicana de los 80's—Fobia. Su canción "El Diablo" es un poco antes de mi tiempo, sin embargo la tengo en mi cabeza desde que la descubrí hace una semana.

Y como siempre, tenemos lugar para bandas nuevas: "Diablo!" de la banda puertorriqueña Davila 666 es una graciosa canción acerca de un terrible engaño amoroso. Y el cantautor uruguayo Guarco nos cuenta sobre las criaturas demónicas que habitan en su mente en la balada "Monstruo".

Por supuesto que incluimos algunas de las canciones mas legendarias: Chavela Vargas canta "La Llorona" con una pasión aterradora. Y El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico toca una de mis canciones de salsa favoritas, "La Muerte". Siempre me ha fascinado como las canciones de salsa a veces hablan de temas trágicos como la muerte, el prisión, la mentira y la traición, pero con música energética y feliz.

Y hablando de leyendas, este año hicimos algo distinto: hemos estado pidiéndole a nuestros oyentes que nos manden sus historias de miedo favoritas, cuentos tradicionales de a lo largo de América Latina, y también compartimos algunas de los nuestros. Felix Contreras jura que tiene un amigo que una vez vió al Chupacabras- tal vez iba camino a chupar sangre. Nuestro oyente David Angel Lindes de Guatemala creció asustado del Sombrerón, cuyos encantos son fatales para las mujeres. ¿Y yo? Bueno...digamos que nunca me van a ver caminando de noche por La Pampa argentina, por miedo a cruzarme con La Luz Mala.

Estas leyendas tienen miles de versiones. A veces La Llorona es una mujer indígena que se enamoró de un español y le dió tres hijos antes de que el la deje por una mujer española de la alta sociedad; descorazonada, La Llorona ahogó a sus hijos en un río. Desde entonces su espíritu ronda por el mundo, buscando a sus hijos y llorando. En otras versiones, La Llorona es una mujer bellísima que ahogó a sus hijos porque estaba celosa de la cantidad de tiempo que su marido pasaba con ellos. Existen muchas variaciones del mismo cuento a través de América Latina y España, pero una cosa es segura: cuando tus papás te dicen que no salgas de noche porque te va a agarrar La Llorona, les hacés caso y te escondés debajo de tu frazada.

Y ya que estás ahí debajo de tus frazadas, llorando como un chiquito aterrorizado, subile el volumen a Alt.Latino. ¡Esta semana le estamos poniendo música a tus peores pesadillas!

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.