Guest DJs

Guest DJ With Adrian Quesada, A Man Who Needs Four Bands

Adrian Quesada of Ocote Soul Sounds, Brownout Presents Brown Sabbath, The Echocentrics, and Spanish Gold. i

Adrian Quesada of Ocote Soul Sounds, Brownout Presents Brown Sabbath, The Echocentrics, and Spanish Gold. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the artist
Adrian Quesada of Ocote Soul Sounds, Brownout Presents Brown Sabbath, The Echocentrics, and Spanish Gold.

Adrian Quesada of Ocote Soul Sounds, Brownout Presents Brown Sabbath, The Echocentrics, and Spanish Gold.

Courtesy of the artist

Adrian Quesada has a restless artistic vision — so much so that he needs four bands to accommodate his musical ideas, as well as a handful of producing gigs to help other artists realize their sound.

The Austin musician and producer is Alt.Latino's latest Guest DJ. We asked him on the show in hopes of gleaning some insights into that most ethereal of music-industry gigs: record producer. It's a role that's part therapist, part conductor, part visionary and part techno geek. Here, Quesada gives us a peek into the music and culture that forms the DNA of his bands — including Brownout Presents Brown Sabbath, a Latin funk outfit that's currently getting its Ozzy on.

Like many of the artists we feature on Alt.Latino, Quesada is the product of a bi-cultural Latino environment: Musica Tejana rubbed elbows with hip-hop for this child of the MTV generation who grew up on the U.S./Mexico border. To me, the music he makes with his bands (or while producing others) has a soft, almost unnoticeable accent, sort of like my grandfather's. My grandfather was fluent in English, but his rural New Mexico roots were always present in his speech.

That influence is obvious in a band like Grupo Fantasma, the retro cumbia and rock outfit that, until recently, Quesada helped lead for many years. But I can also hear it in the mellow, spacey funk romp of Ocote Soul Sounds, a studio project he developed with fellow visionary Martin Perna of Antibalas.

Can I slow the music down and pinpoint exactly how that influence manifests itself in his music? Not really, but I can feel it, and it makes me look forward to each and every release from Ocote. And Brownout. And The Echocentrics. And Spanish Gold.

So sit back and listen to Adrian Quesada talk about his music. Along the way, we'll spin some of the amazing songs he brought in to share with us.

Guest DJ: Adrian Quesada

Ocote Soul Sounds.
Courtesy of the artist

Ocote Soul Sounds/Adrian Quesada

  • Song: Coconut Rock
  • From: Coconut Rock

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Song
Coconut Rock
Album
Coconut Rock
Artist
Ocote Soul Sounds/Adrian Quesada
Label
Eighteenth Street
Released
2009

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Cover for Dance of the Rainbow Serpent

Carlos Santana

  • Song: Evil Ways
  • From: Dance of the Rainbow Serpent

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Song
Evil Ways
Album
Dance of the Rainbow Serpent
Artist
Carlos Santana
Label
Columbia/Legacy
Released
1995

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Ocote Soul Sounds

Ocote Soul Sounds Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ocote Soul Sounds/Adrian Quesada

  • Song: Tamarindio
  • From: Niño y el Sol

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Song
Tamarindio
Album
Niño y el Sol
Artist
Ocote Soul Sounds/Adrian Quesada
Label
ESL
Released
2004

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Grupo Komo
Courtesy of the artist

Grupo Komo

  • Song: Otro Ladrillo En La Pared
  • From: Otro Ladrillo En La Pared
The Temptations
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The Temptations

  • Song: Ain't No Sunshine
  • From: Solid Rock

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Song
Ain't No Sunshine
Album
Solid Rock
Artist
The Temptations
Label
Motown
Released
1972

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Cover for Inspiration Information

Shuggie Otis

  • Song: Inspiration Information
  • From: Inspiration Information

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Song
Inspiration Information
Album
Inspiration Information
Artist
Shuggie Otis
Label
Luaka Bop

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