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Immigrant Voices: Writers Share Stories Of Coming, Staying, Going Back Home

Families communicated through a border fence at San Diego's Friendship Park Nov. 17. On weekends, people on the American side are allowed to to visit, under U.S. Border Patrol supervision, with family and friends in Mexico. i i

Families communicated through a border fence at San Diego's Friendship Park Nov. 17. On weekends, people on the American side are allowed to to visit, under U.S. Border Patrol supervision, with family and friends in Mexico. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images
Families communicated through a border fence at San Diego's Friendship Park Nov. 17. On weekends, people on the American side are allowed to to visit, under U.S. Border Patrol supervision, with family and friends in Mexico.

Families communicated through a border fence at San Diego's Friendship Park Nov. 17. On weekends, people on the American side are allowed to to visit, under U.S. Border Patrol supervision, with family and friends in Mexico.

John Moore/Getty Images

This week on Alt.Latino, we pay tribute to immigrant stories. With the help of Cuban-American writer and editor Achy Obejas, we're bringing you readings by celebrated authors on the topic of immigration, from Latin America to Asia, Africa and the Middle East. It's all part of a new book called Immigrant Voices: 21st Century Stories, edited by Obejas and Megan Bayles.

While music isn't the centerpiece of this show, we are featuring Cuban pianist Omar Sosa. And as always, we're eager to hear from you. Feel free to share your own immigration stories in the comments section below. Where did you and your family come from? Where are you thinking of going?

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Achy Obejas, Megan Bayles

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