Stuff We Love

This Title Alone Took Me Seven Words

We're hard at work on tomorrow's show. I'm setting up a guy who writes stories, 350 words or less, for cell phones. Pashman is working on a thing about six-word memoirs, and everybody else is still on the twitter crack, in 140 characters or less.

Yup, all sorts of people out there doing cool things with few words. But before six-word memoirs, before cell phone stories, before even cell phones, there was Felix Feneon. He reported tales of crime and depravity for the French newspaper Le Matin in 1906, always anonymously, always in three lines. Below, Feneon explained by Luc Sante, who translated his work. You'll want to click ahead to 24:30:

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

"Fought good fight; lost split decision"

Sent by Warren Hughes | 1:05 PM | 2-10-2008