What's Your CA Dream?

Maryjane Tanquary and Kristin Taylor's CA Dream$

Over the last several weeks, we've asked Day to Day listeners to share their vision of the California Dream. Fame, health, satisfaction, blue sky or innovation—what defines your California Dream? Is the economy forcing that dream to change?

We'll be sharing your responses both on-air and here on Daydreaming. In this installment, Maryjane Tanquary and Kristin Taylor share two variations on a theme: The high cost of California Dream. There price is still right, but buying is not without sacrifice.

Maryjane Tanquary: We never aspired to become Californians. We were living in Italy, an expat assignment. We thought wed be returning to Chicago. But the best job offer was in San Diego. We arrived in May 2004, just about the top of the housing market. We made the plunge. Bought a house that subsequently has lost 100k of value. Do we regret the move. NO! We have become addicted to the weather and the lifestyle. We are poorer but proud to be citizens of the country of progressive California.

Kristin Taylor: I always dreamed of living in Southern California and moved here in 2005 during a time of immense personal upheaval. I had taught for eight years in Connecticut, my home state, and even on my meager teaching salary, I had been able to buy a condo back there. It was quite a shock to realize that I could only afford to rent a small apartment if I wanted to live by myself in Los Angeles there was no chance of ever making enough to buy my own place. I also have to admit that that when I look around at the beautiful Westside private school where I teach now, it stings a little to realize I could never afford to send my own children here. I absolutely love living in Southern California despite how much more expensive it is, and I don't plan to move. But I have had to sacrifice some aspects of my dreams to live here.

If you'd like to share your California Dream, use the contact page provided here.

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