Gasoline

Midnight Requistion

Gas station at night

Along with the steep increase in the price of gasoline have come many, many reports of theft and fraud, large and small, involving fuel.

LARGE: Police in Prineville, Oregon have charged the city's former public works director with stealing $14,000 work of fuel. They allege James Howard Mole, Sr. left the city work force eighteen months ago, but continued to fill vehicles from city-owned pumps.

SMALL: Concord, New Hampshire police arrested a woman who pumped 12 gallons of gas into her car and drove away without paying. Koallie Rowe, 21 was charged with theft.

SMALL: According to the Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune, a thief recently siphoned about 22 gallons of gas from a vehicle parked in the driveway of Ramsey County Sheriff Bob Fletcher's home.

LARGE: The Texas Department of Agriculture says a major gasoline retailer in that state routinely cheated customers by delivering less gasoline than the pumps indicated. Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples said in a statement that evidence "strongly indicates this could have been a deliberate act by the company."

SMALL: (with complications): Prosecutor's in South Bend, Indiana charged a local woman with theft and battery in connection with a gas theft. They allege Shonta Bailey, 29, tried to drive away without paying for $30 worth of gas at a service station. A female attendant at the station stood in front of Bailey's car to prevent her from leaving. Prosecutors say the attendant was thrown to the roadway when Bailey sped away, and suffered road rash and multiple bruises.

EXTRA LARGE: The US Army's Kuwait Fraud Task Force has charges that an employee of a civilian contractor was part of a ring that stole more than 10 million gallons of jet and diesel in May and June of this year. Investigators say Lee William Dubois fraudulently obtained access cards which let him pump fuel from tanks at Camp Liberty in Baghdad. The gas was hauled away in trucks, they say, and sold on the black market. Value of the stolen petrol — just under $40 million.

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