Ludwig's Links: What would Beethoven Read This Week? Dec. 24, 2010

Beethoven would have kept his eye on the news. i i

Beethoven would have kept his eye on the news even during the holidays. iStock hide caption

itoggle caption iStock
Beethoven would have kept his eye on the news.

Beethoven would have kept his eye on the news even during the holidays.

iStock

Some conversation topics for the eggnogged hours 'round the fire:

  • Hallelujah Scramble: A flash performance of Handel's Messiah by the Sacramento Choral Society got a little too much publicity beforehand — so many people showed up that police evacuated the mall.
  • Silence Squashed: A Web campaign to propel John Cage's 4'33 to the Christmas No. 1 spot in the U.K. has crumbled under the dominion of Matt Carter, the winner of the popular singing show "The X Factor." The entirely silent 4'33 made it to number 21, which isn't bad for a single with no hook.
  • The Detroit Symphony is still in dire straits — the financial impact of the strike, which has lasted almost three months, could last long after the concerts start again. U.S. Senator Carl Levin and Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm have proposed a compromise — but it seems to appeal to the musicians more than it does to management.
  • A Future In Doubt: Kyle MacMillan of the Denver Post wraps up his three-part series on the state of classical music with a look at the possible future of the industry.
  • Revived In Versailles: A forgotten opera by Jean-Baptist Lully has made its comeback in Versailles. Michael White of the Telegraph went to the first performance in 300 years.
  • China's Opera Boom: After years spent building state-of-the art opera houses, China is experiencing a boom in opera production and original opera creation.
  • Back In Business: New York City Opera has had a major comeback this year under the directon of George Steel.


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