Around The Classical Internet: October 21, 2011

She's happy to sign, but she won't be singing: Anna Netrebko in New York on October 12, 2011 in New York City. i i

She's happy to sign, but she won't be singing: Anna Netrebko in New York on October 12, 2011 in New York City.

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itoggle caption Simon Russell/Getty Images
She's happy to sign, but she won't be singing: Anna Netrebko in New York on October 12, 2011 in New York City.

She's happy to sign, but she won't be singing: Anna Netrebko in New York on October 12, 2011 in New York City.

Simon Russell/Getty Images
  • Were you looking forward to Anna Netrebko's recital debut at Carnegie Hall, which was scheduled for next week? Well, too bad for you. She says her doctor ordered ten days of vocal rest after her taxing Anna Bolena run at the Met. As things stood, there was an eight-day gap between Bolena and the Carnegie date. (And this is the second time Netrebko's put the kibosh on this concert; she also canceled on Carnegie in 2006.)
  • The Louisville Orchestra issued a hard-line ultimatum to its players: The musicians have until 4 PM today to accept their latest offer, or management will "begin the process of hiring permanent replacements." The musicians are reported as saying "no way."
  • Pretty cool: The Detroit Symphony is offering $20 tickets to Detroit residents for any of their classical or jazz offerings this season.
  • Hometown heroes: On Tuesday, the Seattle Symphony honored its city's musical legacy with premieres of commissions honoring Jimi Hendrix, Quincy Jones and Kurt Cobain. A fourth piece, the new Savana by Phillip A. Peterson, featured the Seattle-based band Hey Marseilles.
  • On Thursday, the LA Phil, music director Gustavo Dudamel and soloist Johannes Moser premiered Magnetar, a concerto for electric cello by Mexican composer Enrico Chapela. The title refers to a neutron star that produces a magnetic field a quadrillion times stronger than Earth's.
  • The Financial Times' classical music critic has lunch with pianist Mitsuko Uchida, which winds up being mostly a rather weird discourse embracing a wide array of cultural stereotypes. (However, she really likes the Brits.)
  • He's just turned 84, but Sir Colin Davis' schedule for the next two years is, as he puts it, "madness, really." Also? He's an enthusiastic knitter, which was news to me but not to readers of the Guardian.
  • The Human Rights Foundation has called crossover violinist Vanessa-Mae, along with actress Hilary Swank, action star Jean-Claude Van Damme and singer Seal, on the carpet for showing up to celebrate Chechen president Ramzan Kadyrov's 35th birthday. Vanessa-Mae reportedly charged $500,000 for her performance at the party. Shakira, Kevin Costner and Eva Mendes all are reported to have declined the invitation from Kadyrov, who has been accused of torture, kidnapping political opponents and extrajudicial executions, among other crimes.

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