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HOW LEARNING HAPPENS

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President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the ESEA in 1965 with Kate Deadrich Loney, his first schoolteacher. Yoichi Okamoto/LBJ Presidential Library hide caption

itoggle caption Yoichi Okamoto/LBJ Presidential Library

Student Raul Ramos goes through his online homework during a session of a massive open online class, or MOOC, in Madrid, Spain. Andres Kudacki/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Andres Kudacki/AP

Egg babies created by Aaron Warren's ninth-grade students at Orthopaedic Hospital Medical Magnet High School in Los Angeles. Courtesy of Aaron Warren hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Aaron Warren

G.W. Carver Preparatory Academy has enrolled more than 50 unaccompanied minors from Central America. Principal Ben Davis says he's spending an extra $2,500 per student for special education services and instructional software tailored for them. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption LA Johnson/NPR

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University set out to study how infants use what they already know to motivate future learning. Len Turner, Dave Schmelick and Deirdre Hammer/Johns Hopkins University Office of Communications hide caption

itoggle caption Len Turner, Dave Schmelick and Deirdre Hammer/Johns Hopkins University Office of Communications

The Education Department, headed by Secretary Arne Duncan, says it's keeping a close eye on 556 colleges and universities that do a poor job of complying with federal regulations and handling federal financial aid. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jacquelyn Martin/AP