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Catharine Becker of Fullerton, Calif., was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer at 43 despite having a clean mammogram. The mother of three didn't know she had dense breast tissue until after she was diagnosed. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

itoggle caption Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Sequencing the genes of a cancer cell turns up lots of genetic mutations — but some of them are harmless. The goal is to figure out which mutations are the troublemakers. Kevin Curtis/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption Kevin Curtis/Science Source

Martha and Alvaro Galvis used to travel from New Hampshire to Boston to watch the marathon every year. Both were hurt in the bombing two years ago. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

itoggle caption Jesse Costa/WBUR

To sleep, perchance to consolidate important connections in far-flung parts of the brain. Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Corbis

Anne Koller closes her eyes as an oncology nurse attaches a line for chemotherapy to a port in her chest. Koller typically spends three to six hours getting each treatment. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

itoggle caption Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

This spiral CT image of the chest shows a large malignant mass (purple) in one lung. A conventional chest X-ray could have missed this tumor, radiologists say. Medical Body Scans/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption Medical Body Scans/Science Source

Some researchers recommend starting mammogram screening at age 40, while others say age 50. Some doctors think screening should be based on a woman's overall risk for breast cancer, not just her age. Hero Images/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Hero Images/Corbis