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Some researchers recommend starting mammogram screening at age 40, while others say age 50. Some doctors think screening should be based on a woman's overall risk for breast cancer, not just her age. Hero Images/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Hero Images/Corbis

For someone 2.5 inches shorter than average, the risk of coronary artery disease increases by about 13.5 percent, scientists found. PW Illustration/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption PW Illustration/Ikon Images/Corbis

The Allen Institute for Brain Science hosted its first BigNeuron Hackathon in Beijing earlier this month. Similar events are planned for the U.S. and U.K. Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science

There's a widely held assumption that a slight imbalance in male births has its start at the very moment of conception. But researchers say factors later in pregnancy are more likely to explain the phenomenon. CNRI/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption CNRI/Science Source

NPR senior Washington editor Beth Donovan walks on a treadmill desk in her office in Washington, D.C. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Olympic gold medalist Sanya Richards-Ross pulls on compression sleeves before a 400-meter race at the World Indoor Athletics Championships in Istanbul in 2012. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Martin Meissner/AP