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A nurse at the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco protests lack of Ebola preparedness in October. The issue will be the focus of national demonstrations Wednesday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Debra Blackmon (left) was sterilized by court order in 1972, at age 14. With help from her niece, Latoya Adams (right), she's fighting to be included in the state's compensation program. Eric Mennel/WUNC hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Mennel/WUNC

Dr. Angela Alday talks with Isidro Hernandes, via a Spanish-speaking interpreter, Armando Jimenez. Both patient and doctor say they much prefer an in-person interpreter to one on the phone. Jeff Schilling/Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare hide caption

itoggle caption Jeff Schilling/Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare

The problem isn't just that fake cures are worthless, doctors say. Fraudulent claims also give some people the false sense that the product can protect them from getting sick. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

A rogues gallery of the viruses (left to right) that cause MERS, SARS, and influenza. Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source

An official at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor says its mix of patients helps explain the infection rates. Scott C. Soderberg/Courtesy of University of Michigan Health System hide caption

itoggle caption Scott C. Soderberg/Courtesy of University of Michigan Health System

One rationale for extending Medicaid coverage to more people is to help them get to a doctor or clinic before a minor illness becomes a medical emergency. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

A man walks past the former site of a clinic that offered abortions in El Paso, Texas. Juan Carlos Llorca/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Juan Carlos Llorca/AP

Alana and Troy Pack died in 2003 when a woman abusing pain pills hit the children with her car. The accident has led to a ballot measure that, among other things, would put new constraints on physicians. Courtesy of the Pack family hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the Pack family

For some rural vets who live far from a VA hospital, getting medical care has meant driving a day or two from home, and missing work. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto