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A passenger wearing a face mask arrives at Los Angeles International Airport Friday. Federal officials now require people traveling from West Africa to enter the U.S. at one of five airports equipped to screen them for signs of Ebola. Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images

The cruise ship Carnival Magic floats behind a catamaran off Cozumel, Mexico on Oct. 17. The ship skipped a planned stop there Friday, the cruise line says, after Mexican authorities delayed granting permission to dock. Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Reuters/Landov

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Avian influenza, or bird flu, causes an infectious and contagious respiratory disease. In the lab, several scientists have made the H5N1 strain more contagious, a controversial line of research. James Cavallini/ScienceSource hide caption

itoggle caption James Cavallini/ScienceSource

An ambulance carrying Amber Vinson, the second health care worker to be diagnosed with Ebola in Texas, arrives at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Wednesday. David Tulis/AP hide caption

itoggle caption David Tulis/AP

A school official shows a pupil an infrared digital laser thermometer before taking his temperature in Lagos, Nigeria, in September. Starting this week, similar hand-held devices are checking foreheads for fever at some U.S. airports. Akintunde Akinleye/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Akintunde Akinleye/Reuters/Landov

Scenes from an outbreak: Ebola survivor Dr. Kent Brantly; Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas; A worker cleans the apartment where Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan stayed in Dallas; experimental vaccine; the Carnival Magic cruise ship off Cozumel, Mexico. Jessica McGowan/Getty; Mike Stone/Getty Images; Jim Young/Reuters/Landov; Steve Parsons/AP; Angel Castellanos/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jessica McGowan/Getty; Mike Stone/Getty Images; Jim Young/Reuters/Landov; Steve Parsons/AP; Angel Castellanos/AP

Nina Pham, shown here in a 2010 college yearbook photo, became infected with Ebola virus while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan in a Dallas hospital. Courtesy of tcu360.com/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of tcu360.com/AP

Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., was the first to report a surge of children with serious respiratory illness in August. Andy Pollard/Children's Mercy Kansas City hide caption

itoggle caption Andy Pollard/Children's Mercy Kansas City

Thomas Eric Duncan died at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas Wednesday morning. He is the first person to have been diagnosed with Ebola in the United States. LM Otero/AP hide caption

itoggle caption LM Otero/AP

Ideally, the best place to care for someone ill with Ebola is at the end of a hall in a room with its own bathroom, anteroom and entrance, says Dr. Jack Ross of Hartford Hospital. Jeff Cohen/WNPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jeff Cohen/WNPR

A private security guard patrols the apartment building in Dallas where Ebola patient Thomas Duncan stayed. The family that hosted him is quarantined. Tom Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Sofia Jarvis, seen here with her family at a press conference in February, is one of several dozen children in California who have been diagnosed with a rare paralytic syndrome. It has left her left arm paralyzed. Martha Mendoza/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Martha Mendoza/AP

Traffic moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, where a patient showed up with symptoms that were later confirmed to be Ebola. Mike Stone/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mike Stone/Getty Images

A patient at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has a confirmed case of Ebola, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. He is being treated and kept in strict isolation. LM Otero/AP hide caption

itoggle caption LM Otero/AP

Daniela Chavarriaga holds her daughter Emma as Dr. Jose Rosa-Olivares administers a measles vaccination at Miami Children's Hospital. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images