Treatments

Obama 'Fit For Duty,' But Smoking Still A Problem

Transforming the nation's health care system is apparently easy compared with giving up cigarettes.

President Barack Obama turns to talk to reporters, as he walks across Lafayette Park in Washington, i i

President Barack Obama turns to talk to reporters, as he walks across Lafayette Park in Washington, Monday, March 1, 2010. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Charles Dharapak/AP
President Barack Obama turns to talk to reporters, as he walks across Lafayette Park in Washington,

President Barack Obama turns to talk to reporters, as he walks across Lafayette Park in Washington, Monday, March 1, 2010.

Charles Dharapak/AP

The results of President Obama's first annual physical, released Sunday, suggest he's still lighting up. The evidence is oblique but clear. White House doctor Jeffrey Kuhlman writes Obama should "continue smoking cessation efforts." The president's list of meds also includes nicotine gum, when he needs it.

While the president was declared "fit for duty," he does need to clean up his diet. His total cholesterol is 209, on the borderline for trouble. His LDL, or bad cholesterol, is 138, and the doctor wants him to get that below 130. No drugs needed, for now, instead the doctor recommends eating better.

At Obama's last physical in July 2008, his cholesterol stood at 173, with his bad cholesterol at 96 and his good cholesterol at 68, the Associated Press reported.

What else do we know about Obama's health? Well, his lungs sounded good. His vision is fine, though there's a hint of nearsightedness, something that's not exactly unusual for a 48 year old. He's also got some pain in his left knee. Occasionally, he takes mild painkillers, of the type that include ibuprofen, after physical activity.

If you're interested in the summary from Obama's doctor, you can read it here.

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