Your Health

Commenters Bite Back On The Paleo Diet

Vlad Averbukh, 29, a follower of the paleo diet, eats raw meat along the Hudson River in New York in 2010. (Averbukh did not weigh in on our blog post on the paleo diet.) i i

Vlad Averbukh, 29, a follower of the paleo diet, eats raw meat along the Hudson River in New York in 2010. (Averbukh did not weigh in on our blog post on the paleo diet.) Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images
Vlad Averbukh, 29, a follower of the paleo diet, eats raw meat along the Hudson River in New York in 2010. (Averbukh did not weigh in on our blog post on the paleo diet.)

Vlad Averbukh, 29, a follower of the paleo diet, eats raw meat along the Hudson River in New York in 2010. (Averbukh did not weigh in on our blog post on the paleo diet.)

Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Our post on the paleo diet moving from the CrossFit gym to the doctor's office generated a robust discussion here in our comments section (and on NPR's Facebook page).

Readers batted around the relative merits of the paleo diet, how to interpret Paleolithic man's short lifespan and the meaning of evolutionary medicine, among other issues.

As the comments show, the question of whether there is an ideal human diet — and whether we should look to the past to find it — is a provocative one. And many of our commenters, like the scientists studying these issues, aren't in agreement with each other.

We took a spin through the comments and pulled out some of those that struck us as most intriguing. Feel free to comment.

Comments

 

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