Inside NPR.org

Download Your Favorite NPR Stories

Today we added a new feature to npr.org that has been at the top of the request list for many of you — the ability to download audio for individual stories right from the story page.

On almost every story from NPR news and music you now have the ability to take the audio with you and enjoy it anywhere. While online you can download and save your favorite interviews, reports, performances and more. Then add the audio to your mp3 player, phone, laptop or netbook to take with you and listen offline wherever you go. It's one more way NPR is making it easier for you to listen and share.

To download audio from NPR, just find any story like this one from Nina Totenberg, Obama Picks Sotomayor For High Court click on the link with the red 'down' arrow and a download of the mp3 file will begin automatically.

You will find several types of stories don't have a download available. These will usually be things like exclusive music tracks, live concerts or acquired programs we don't have all the rights to. Not all our archives are available in a format that's downloadable, so you won't find links to those stories either but we'll be adding more in the future. You may also notice these mp3s don't have all the ID3 tags and information about the story you might like to find tagged in the file. This is an improvement we are working on and will be bringing to you soon to make it easier to organize all the NPR stories saved in your collection.

We hope you'll find this new feature a quick and easy way to enjoy and share your favorite NPR stories. Whether you're online or off, we want you to always be able to take NPR along with you.

Thanks for all the support and ideas, keep letting us know more ways we can help bring NPR to you wherever you are.

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