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And We Are Live! New Comments on NPR.org

After several weeks of work and several years of planning, we are now live with a new commenting system on NPR.org. Please forgive a few glitches today and over the next few days as we migrate comments.

In August we sent many of you a survey to many of you, asking your thoughts and opinions regarding commenting on NPR.org. We had a great response: over 6,000 of you took the time to tell us what you thought. The feedback was very valuable. We've used it to help guide some key decisions in this process.

Now that Disqus is live, here are some of the commenting enhancements you will find:

  • Comment discussions can now threaded, making it easier to follow along. You can now reply directly to each others' comments.
  • By default, comments will be sorted by comment quality, allowing you to read the best comments first. You can change your default to sort by newest or oldest instead.
  • When we surveyed our users about moderation, a majority of you believed that all comments should be moderated prior to publication. We will be doing that across the news areas of our site. Other areas of our site, such as music and books, will not be reviewed prior to posting, but only reviewed after users have flagged the comments.
  • You will have the ability to edit and delete your own comments, and use basic HTML formatting in your posts.

We also want to highlight a few frequently asked questions about the transition:

  • Your existing login will work with the new commenting system.
  • Comments that you have made over the last four years will be migrated to the new system and accessible to you and other readers of the site.
  • Your first and last name is no longer required to create an account (though we do prefer it!). If you do provide your name, it will be displayed when you make a comment. If you don't provide your name, just your username (formerly called a nickname) will be displayed.
  • Please be aware that comments made on the new Disqus platform may be searchable on public search engines.
  • Commenting on NPR means an account will be created for you with Disqus.com and your comments and user profile will be available on the Disqus platform. If this makes you uncomfortable, we understand. You have the ability to delete your past comments, and we can help you delete your account as well.

Visit our Community FAQ for more detail.

We want to thank you for being an active member of the NPR community. Have any questions? Ask below!

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

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