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Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush addresses the audience at his most recent Conservative Political Action Conference appearance in March 2013. Bush is to appear again Friday, as he considers a potential 2016 presidential campaign. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jacquelyn Martin/AP

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House Speaker John Boehner told reporters Wednesday: "The House has done its job to fund the Department of Homeland Security and to stop the president's overreach on immigration. We're waiting for the Senate to do their job." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has offered Democrats a Department of Homeland Security funding bill without provisions, but Democrats still want a commitment from House Speaker John Boehner. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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If Congress doesn't act to fund the Department of Homeland Security by Friday, then over 200,000 TSA employees won't be receiving paychecks — but many of them will still have to show up to work. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush answers questions Wednesday after speaking to the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. The likely 2016 presidential candidate says he will be guided by his own thinking and experiences when it comes to foreign policy questions. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

itoggle caption M. Spencer Green/AP

Supporters cheer in Colorado Springs, Colo., as a television broadcast declares that Republicans have taken control of the Senate. Republican candidates, party committees and outside groups spent about $44 million more than Democrats, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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The heightened partisanship cemented in congressional districts has created havens for both Democrats and Republicans, whose job security now often depends more on pleasing primary voters than on the high-altitude questions facing the nation at large. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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The Senate Finance Committee has one of the more straightforward names on Capitol Hill. Others, like the education committee, have seen frequent name changes to reflect party priorities. Tom Williams/Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Election worker Bradley Kryst loads voting machines onto a truck at the Clark County election warehouse on Nov. 3, in North Las Vegas. As voting machine technology changes, state elections officials are trying to keep up. John Locher/AP hide caption

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President George W. Bush addressed a joint session of Congress shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks, vowing to tap "every resource" to fight terrorism. Two days before the speech, he had signed an Authorization for Use of Military Force passed by Congress. WIN MACNAMEE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky returns to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington on Jan. 29, 2015. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

itoggle caption J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks at an Economic Club of Detroit meeting on Wednesday. The Detroit event is the first in a series of stops that Bush's team is calling his "Right to Rise" tour. That's also the name of the political action committee he formed in December 2014 to allow him to explore a presidential run. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Paul Sancya/AP