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President Obama's speech in Las Vegas on Tuesday on the country's immigration system was as notable for what was said as for what wasn't. Isaac Brekken/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Isaac Brekken/AP

President Obama "strongly but respectfully disagrees with the ruling" on recess appointments by a federal appeals court, says White House spokesman Jay Carney. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Carolyn Kaster/AP

Actor Jimmy Stewart in a scene from the 1939 movie Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, which popularized the notion of a "talking filibuster." Even under changes negotiated in the Senate, the talking filibuster remains a thing of the past. AP hide caption

itoggle caption AP

States are moving further apart on hot-button issues such as abortion and health care — and many may resist laws set in Washington. Frankljunior/iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption Frankljunior/iStockphoto.com

The U.S. Capitol at sunrise on Monday, before President Obama's second inauguration. While the president raised big issues in his inaugural address — climate change, gay rights, immigration, the shooting of schoolchildren — none of them appear to top the agenda of Congress, which returned to work Tuesday. Drew Angerer /EPA /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Drew Angerer /EPA /Landov

For editorial cartoonists, Obama's ears are his signature. In some depictions, they've grown throughout the years, but Matt Wuerker says cartoonists have gotten lazy. "We did the same thing to George W. Bush. By the end of his administration he was just Dumbo." Courtesy of Matt Wuerker/Politico hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Matt Wuerker/Politico

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department officer Jay Phillippi looks over a fully automatic Thompson machine gun that was turned in during a "Gifts for Guns" program in Compton, Calif., in 2005. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Chris Carlson/AP

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., left, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., have talked about a deal to change the Senate's filibuster rules. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

itoggle caption J. Scott Applewhite/AP