It's All Politics Political News From NPR

President Obama takes the stage at the University at Buffalo on Thursday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Texas, where abortion-rights battles took place in July at the state capitol, is part of an eight-state region that has gotten more conservative on the issue. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Gay/AP

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal (left) and Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, both Republicans, made a watchdog group's list of bad governors that has a very disproportionate GOP skew. Ronda Churchill/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ronda Churchill/AP

Texas was decidedly red on the electoral map in NBC News' "Election Plaza" in New York's Rockefeller Center in 2008. Do Democrats really have a chance to turn it blue in the future? Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Mary Altaffer/AP

Republicans celebrated when California Gov. Pete Wilson was re-elected in 1994. But his divisive campaign led to a backlash, especially among the growing Latino population in the state. Kevork Djansezian/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Kevork Djansezian/AP

A bilingual sign stands outside a polling center at a public library ahead of local elections on April 28 in Austin, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images

Bruce Springsteen performs during halftime of the Super Bowl in Tampa, Fla., in 2009. In music, and increasingly in other industries, a relative handful of top performers take more and more of the spoils, says White House chief economist Alan Krueger. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Mark J. Terrill/AP

President Obama, with Education Secretary Arne Duncan at his side, calls on Congress on June 21, 2012, to stop interest rates on student loans from doubling. He is going to make that appeal again Friday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Susan Walsh/AP