The Stump

Today's Junkie Segment On TOTN: Obama Rallies Dem Troops, GOP Offers Pledge

Former President Jimmy Carter may be feeling better, but he may be among the few Democrats who is.  With less than five weeks to go before Election Day, it's still looking like a big GOP year.

Which is exactly why President Obama has been trying to rally the troops, hoping to duplicate the kind of turnout he received in 2008 for this year's midterms.  But as most presidents find out, that just doesn't usually happen.

While Obama is hoping to end the Democrats' malaise, Republicans are trying to remind voters why they should put them back into power.  House Speaker-in-Waiting John Boehner and his fellow Republicans offered their "Pledge to America," promising tax cuts and limited government.  There may have been little new, but with the polls looking favorable for them, there may have been no reason for them to rock the boat.

Not that everything is fine and dandy in the party of Lincoln.  Mike Castle may be on the verge of launching a write-in campaign in Delaware, a state where Christine O'Donnell and the Tea Party already chalked up a victory.

Plus: Meg Whitman and Jerry Brown debate in California, Rick Lazio drops out in New York but doesn't embrace Carl Paladino, a Rahm Emanuel decision is expected soon, and partisanship breaks out (who'd a thunk it) on the House ethics committee.

All this and, sadly, more, in this week's Political Junkie segment on NPR's Talk of the Nation.

Join host Neal Conan and me every Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET for the Junkie segment on TOTN, where you can often, but not always, find interesting conversation, useless trivia questions and sparkling jokes. And you can win a Political Junkie T-shirt!

If your local NPR station doesn't carry TOTN, you can always hear the program on the Web or on HD Radio. And if you are a subscriber to XM/Sirius radio, you can find the show there as well (siriusly).

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