Today's Junkie Segment On TOTN: Buckeye Politics From Columbus

Four years ago, Republican rule came to a sudden end in Ohio, as Democrats took a Senate seat (Sherrod Brown ousting GOP incumbent Mike DeWine) and the governorship (Ted Strickland succeeding Republican Gov. Bob Taft), as well as most statewide offices.  Democrats continued their ascendancy in the Buckeye State two years later, as Barack Obama took its 20 electoral votes and Democrats picked up three seats in the House, with Steve Driehaus (1st CD), Mary Jo Kilroy (15th) and John Boccieri (16th) coming away victorious.

But just as Ohio was a case study of what was going right for the Democrats in those two election cycles, Ohio may now be a sign of what's going wrong for them.  Strickland, Driehaus, Kilroy and Buccieri are all in jeopardy of losing their jobs next month, and in the open Senate contest, vacated by retiring GOP incumbent George Voinovich, Republican Rob Portman looks like he will win going away.

And that's what brings the Political Junkie segment on Talk of the Nation to Columbus today.  We'll review the electoral landscape with special guests Congressman Driehaus and the Republican he unseated two years ago, Steve Chabot, who is back for revenge.

Plus:  Lots of debates taking place, and we'll focus on the California gubernatorial, Kentucky Senate and Connecticut Senate races.  Also, Charlie Rangel and Maxine Waters have a trial date,

Join host Neal Conan and me every Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET for the Junkie segment on TOTN, where you can often, but not always, find interesting conversation, useless trivia questions and sparkling jokes. And you can win a Political Junkie T-shirt!

If your local NPR station doesn't carry TOTN, you can always hear the program on the Web or on HD Radio. And if you are a subscriber to XM/Sirius radio, you can find the show there as well (siriusly).

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