Today's Junkie Segment On TOTN: Rangel Guilty, Kyl Balking, Steele Reeling

Thank you, Sue Taylor of Indianapolis, for a very nice note sharing her concern that with the election over, the Political Junkie segment on NPR's Talk of the Nation might go away.

That's not likely, unless politics itself goes away.  And there's no sign that that is about to happen.

Not when there are leadership elections on Capitol Hill (with many wondering how many Democrats will vote no on Nancy Pelosi in the House), not when Charlie Rangel is found guilty of 11 violations of House rules, not when the political director of the RNC quits his post with a blast at chairman Michael Steele, not when Lisa Murkowski (or is it Murcowsky?) has opened up a 10,000 vote lead in Alaska, not when Jon Kyl gives the Obama administration a jolt by saying the Senate should hold off on the START treaty with Russia until next year, and not when Mitch McConnell accedes to Tea Party demands and switches his position on earmarks.

Today's special guest is Rep. Bart Stupak, the Michigan Democrat who is retiring this year and who played a major — and controversial — role in the passage of health care overhaul.

Last week's segment, broadcast from the studios of member station WCPN in Cleveland, and which featured Rep.-elect Jim Renacci (R-Ohio) and Cleveland Plain Dealer columnist Thomas Suddes, can be heard here.

Join host Neal Conan and me every Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET for the Junkie segment on TOTN, where you can often, but not always, find interesting conversation, useless trivia questions and sparkling jokes. And you can win a Political Junkie T-shirt!

If your local NPR station doesn't carry TOTN, you can always hear the program on the Web or on HD Radio. And if you are a subscriber to XM/Sirius radio, you can find the show there as well (siriusly).

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