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Obama Will Take Tougher Stands In Future: Jimmy Carter

As part of his media blitz for the one thousandth book he has written since his presidency ended (okay, it's actually 25; it just seems like many more) former President Jimmy Carter told CBS News' Bill Plante that he foresees President Obama becoming a fiercer advocate for his policies going forward.

An excerpt from the CBS News Web story on its interview with the 39th president:

"In the next two years President Obama will be much more independent in fighting hard to prevail and not trying to reach out, which turned out to be fruitlessly, to get two or three Republican votes for this and that," Mr. Carter said in an interview for CBSNews.com's "Washington Unplugged." "I think he'll be a much more tough proponent of what he stands for in the future, giving up on Republicans support and taking his case to the American public."

Meanwhile, in an observation that proves how cockeyed the world is now (or was back then) Carter notes that he actually had more support from some congressional Republicans during his presidency than he had from some Democrats.

He cites Sen. Howard Baker, the Tennessee Republican, and Rep. Bob Michel, an Illinois Republican, who gave him "maximum support."

It was liberal Democrats supporting of Sen. Ted Kennedy whose support he lost in the last two years of his presidency, Carter says. What he didn't say is that it was partly that loss of liberal Democratic support that spelled his political doom.

Of today's Republicans, Carter says they've been "irresponsible" and he seems to use that word in all of its meanings, that they've been reckless and that they haven't had control.

"The Republicans so far have been totally irresponsible. They've not taken responsibility for anything. And they've deprived President Obama of any votes for key issues. Sometimes he hasn't gotten a single vote in the House or Senate, as you know. Now that they have taken control of the House of Representatives, they'll be responsible for a major element of the U.S. government, that is the House of Representatives. How they vote in there, they'll have to go to the American people and say "This is the way we voted and this is why."

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