Today's Junkie Segment On TOTN: David Frum On 'No Labels' Effort

Politics, in Goldilocks parlance, can be too hot, too cold, or just right.

Others, however, see it as completely dysfunctional.  A new organization, No Labels, is having its official launch next week, with the purpose of getting leaders to "put their political labels aside to work together" and "solve problems."

Lots of luck with that one.

But many people have signed on to the effort, and one of them, former Bush speechwriter David Frum, is our special guest in today's Political Junkie segment on NPR's Talk of the Nation.

Frum is of the belief that one doesn't necessarily have to give up his or her political label, just "put it aside to do what's best" for the country.

Lots more to talk about.  The wrangling over tax cuts, unemployment insurance, the New START Treaty and "Don't Ask Don't Tell."  Wrangling over who will be the next chairman of the Republican National Committee.  And wrangling over Charlie Rangel — will the House censure him, as the ethics committee has proposed, or just reprimand him, as the New York Democrat would prefer?

And we still don't have a winner in the races for Alaska Senate, Minnesota governor and New York's 1st Congressional District.

Last week's segment, featuring Rep.-elect Chip Cravaack (R-Minn.) and ethics expert Lara Brown of Villanova University, can be heard here.

Join host Neal Conan and me every Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET for the Junkie segment on TOTN, where you can often, but not always, find interesting conversation, useless trivia questions and sparkling jokes. And you can win a Political Junkie T-shirt!

(Neal is off this week; Tony Cox is subbing for him.)

If your local NPR station doesn't carry TOTN, you can always hear the program on the Web or on HD Radio. And if you are a subscriber to XM/Sirius radio, you can find the show there as well (siriusly).

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