Rahm Emanuel Gets Judge's OK For Chicago Mayoral Run

Chicago mayoral candidate Rahm Emanuel after a news conference at the Better Boys Foundation, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011. i i

Chicago mayoral candidate Rahm Emanuel after a news conference at the Better Boys Foundation, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011. M. Spencer Green/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

itoggle caption M. Spencer Green/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago mayoral candidate Rahm Emanuel after a news conference at the Better Boys Foundation, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011.

Chicago mayoral candidate Rahm Emanuel after a news conference at the Better Boys Foundation, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011.

M. Spencer Green/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rahm Emanuel took another step Tuesday toward his goal of becoming Chicago's next mayor with a county judge's ruling that his name should appear on the February primary ballot.

The judge agreed with the Cook County Board of Election Commissioners that that President Obama's former chief of staff satisfied the residency requirement to run for mayor.

Emanuel's opponents have claimed that the former top White House aide wasn't eligible, saying he gave up his residency when he moved his family to Washington.

The Chicago Tribune reported:

In his ruling, (Judge Mark J.) Ballard said (lawyer for Emanuel's opponents, Burt) Odelson failed to prove Emanuel abandoned his North Side home when he became White House chief of staff and agreed with the election board's finding that Emanuel never intended to "terminate his residence in Chicago." He also said that "having a place to sleep" is not a "touchstone of continued residence."

Meanwhile, for those who wonder what kind of ideas Emanuel has to improve Chicago, let's put it this way: when you see a garbage truck you probably aren't seeing what Emanuel sees when he spots one.

Another Chicago Tribune excerpt:

Mayoral candidate Rahm Emanuel said today he would allow advertising on city vehicle stickers, garbage trucks and at public events like farmers markets to help pay for an after-school program to protect students from violence by keeping them off the streets.

The former White House chief of staff hopes to raise $25 million through the ad push, according to information released at an Emanuel news conference.

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