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As Anthony Weiner Tries To Move On Media Won't

Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-NY) leaves after telling news media he was done talking about a lewd photo sent to a woman from his Twitter account. i i

hide captionRep. Anthony Weiner (D-NY) leaves after telling news media he was done talking about a lewd photo sent to a woman from his Twitter account.

Alex Wong/Getty Images
Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-NY) leaves after telling news media he was done talking about a lewd photo sent to a woman from his Twitter account.

Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-NY) leaves after telling news media he was done talking about a lewd photo sent to a woman from his Twitter account.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Not a whole lot is certain about Weinergate, at least not for anyone not directly involved.

A few things do seem safe to say, however. One, Rep. Anthony Weiner's strategy of refusing to talk further about the crotch shot that was sent from his Twitter account to a college student (Weiner says his account was hacked) will only get us news media types more worked up.

Some journalists will see his refusal to answer more questions as a challenge to stay on the story, if only to show the New York Democrat and everyone else that they won't be easily dissuaded.

Many a journalist has actually seen the alternative work. That's where the subject of a story talks so much, answering every question asked by journalists so patiently and persuasively, the reporters actually run out of queries and nearly beg to end the news conference themselves.

Two, Weiner said he didn't want to be distracted anymore from the important work he must do. Too late for that. Or maybe it's more accurate to say that while he may not be distracted, others will.

If and when he shows up on cable shows in the next days and weeks, he may be talking about the debt-ceiling issue but many people watching and listening to him will be thinking crotch shot.

Other than that, it's more heat than light at this point.

Meanwhile, the coverage continues. Dan Lyons at the Daily Beast explains how easy it is for an unauthorized person to gain control of someone's social-media account.

The New York Post's S.A. Miller, Perry Chiaramonte and Chuck Bennett more look askance at what they view as Weiner's non-denial denials.

Politico.com's Scott Wong touches on how Weinergate only reinforces worries among Capitol Hill aides have had about the downside of their bosses, the lawmakers, using social media which have an immediacy and non-filtered quality that can make them dangerous politically.

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