Helicopter Christie Really Must Not Be Running For President

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie arrives for his son's high school baseball game. i i

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie arrives for his son's high school baseball game. Christopher Costa/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Christopher Costa/AP
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie arrives for his son's high school baseball game.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie arrives for his son's high school baseball game.

Christopher Costa/AP

Maybe people will now believe New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie when he insists he's not running for president.

Because probably one of the last things any populist politician hoping to run for president would do, and Christie is nothing if not a populist, would be to fly in a state helicopter to his son's high school baseball game as the Newark Star-Ledger reported.

An excerpt:

As the game at St. Joseph Regional High School in Montvale was about to begin, a noise from above distracted the spectators who watched the 55-foot-long helicopter buzz over the trees in left field, circle the outfield and land in an adjacent football field. Christie left the helicopter and got into a black car with tinted windows that drove him about 100 yards to the baseball field. The governor watched from the bleachers as his eldest son, Andrew, played starting catcher for Delbarton School. Christie played the position of catcher in high school as well.

During the fifth inning, Christie and first lady Mary Pat Christie got into the car, rode back to the helicopter and departed. His son's team won the game, 7-2.

Christie evidently was pressed for time because, awaiting him back at the New Jersey governor's official residence, Drumthwacket, (where he doesn't live, by the way) were members of the Iowa GOP who want to draft him to enter the race for the Republican presidential nomination.

The New Jersey State Police said the helicopter costs about $2,500 an hour to operate but that it didn't cost anything extra to fly Christie to the game since it was counted as training time for the crew, according to a Fox News report.

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