Wonky

Who Would Make Your Deficit-Cutting Supercommittee Dream Team?

Oprah Winfrey could be a good pick for a deficit-cutting, fantasy dream team. i i

hide captionOprah Winfrey could be a good pick for a deficit-cutting, fantasy dream team.

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images
Oprah Winfrey could be a good pick for a deficit-cutting, fantasy dream team.

Oprah Winfrey could be a good pick for a deficit-cutting, fantasy dream team.

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

With Congress' leaders poised to select the 12 members of the supercommittee that will decide what spending cuts to make to find $1.5 trillion of savings, we thought it might be fun to think about who should be on that committee on two levels.

The first level would be the more entertaining and more fanciful one. If you could choose any figures, long dead or currently alive, with the ideal qualities to be on that committee, who would you pick for your dream team?

King Solomon of the Bible might leap to mind, for instance, because of that split-the-baby tactic he used to divine the true mother of a child. Very shrewd.

Abraham Lincoln might be another choice because he would make the cuts, presumably, "with malice toward none, with charity towards all."

Oprah's an obvious pick. She's reportedly very good with money, the more zeroes, the better. She's also exceedingly entrepreneurial, having built an entertainment empire from scratch. And she's said to be a very tough negotiator.

You get the idea. If you could choose anyone, who would you choose and why?

The second level would be the more practical one. To paraphrase a former defense secretary, you have to cut deficits with the policymakers you have, not those you'd ideally wish for.

Given that, tell us who would you choose from the current Congress to people your committee and why? My NPR colleague Liz Halloran has a piece about the Washington guessing game on who might be named to the committee.

You don't need to come with 12 names unless you feel like working that hard. Just several or even one would do.

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