Visualizing The Hottest Buzzwords At The Republican Presidential Debate

A word cloud of the GOP debate.

A word cloud of the GOP debate. Matt Stiles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Stiles/NPR

What did the candidates actually say at Wednesday night's Republican presidential debate? The transcript is out, and we got the help of NPR's Matt Stiles to put the entire text in a word cloud. Word clouds are a visual representation of the frequency with which the candidates used certain words. The larger the words, the more often they were mentioned. The words could also reflect the questions the candidates were asked, rather than the message they hoped to convey.

We also created individual word clouds for the candidates who got to talk the most.

Gov. Perry spoke the most of any of the candidates, logging 2,549 words. As you'll see in his word cloud, below, the governor used "state" and "Texas" frequently, perhaps reflecting the fact that he had to defend his record in office:

Perry spoke the most of any of the candidates.

Perry spoke the most of any of the candidates. Matt Stiles hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Stiles

Romney spoke the second highest number of words at 2,383. He used the word "people," in part because he responded to questions about health care by discussing the number of Massachusetts residents covered by the state's plan:

Romney spoke the second highest number of words.

Romney spoke the second highest number of words. Matt Stiles hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Stiles

Here is Jon Huntsman's word cloud. He spoke 1,742 words and mentioned "country" most often:

Huntsman's cloud.

Huntsman's cloud. Matt Stiles hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Stiles

In her 1,486 words, Michelle Bachmann often criticized President Obama, so the word "president" is prominent:

Bachmann's word cloud.

Bachmann's word cloud. Matt Stiles hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Stiles

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