Blagojevich Could Talk Morality But Not Walk It

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich arrived at his home being sentenced to 14-year prison sentence for a political corruption conviction. i i

hide captionFormer Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich arrived at his home being sentenced to 14-year prison sentence for a political corruption conviction.

Paul Beaty/AP
Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich arrived at his home being sentenced to 14-year prison sentence for a political corruption conviction.

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich arrived at his home being sentenced to 14-year prison sentence for a political corruption conviction.

Paul Beaty/AP

The news that former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich was sentenced Wednesday to 14 years in federal prison made me flashback to a brief meeting I had with him that, in hindsight, seems positively surreal.

Back in 2006 when he visited Washington and he stopped by the Chicago Tribune's news bureau where I then worked to talk with a few journalists, we told him we had started a new beat to look at the intersection of politics and religion.

Blagojevich said he liked the idea, that faith was such an important force in American politics because it expressed Americans' desire to see more morality in their politics and government.

Boy, was he ever right. Which is one reason Blagojevich is soon to start a very long stretch on a federal prison facility. He could talk the talk. But walking the walk? Not so much.

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