Monday Political Grab Bag: Obama Opens Lead On Romney In Key Swing States

A new USA Today-Gallup poll showed President Obama opening a 51 percent to 42 percent lead against Mitt Romney in battleground states, improving the picture from a month ago when Obama was in a statistical tie.

Aung San Sun Kyi, the Nobel laureate and long-time advocate for democracy in Myanmar formerly known as Burma won a parliamentary seat in elections Sunday.

New polls taken over the weekend from Public Policy Polling showed Mitt Romney continuing to hold significant leads over his nearest rival, Rick Santorum, within 72 hours of Tuesday's primaries. Romney had a commanding, double-digit lead in Maryland and a smaller seven-point lead in Wisconsin. A win in the Badger State would strengthen Romney's claim on the nomination and raise pressure on the remaining candidates to end their quests before the convention.

Secularist and moderate Egyptians are concerned that Islamists whose political power is growing in that nation are moving to impose their sometimes extreme social and religious views on all Egyptians through legislation.

Former President Bill Clinton said he doubted that Mitt Romney would be able to successfully make the shift from his more conservative primary message to a more centrist message.

Two Romney supporters from Wisconsin's congressional delegation, and Romney's staff, played an April Fool's joke on the Republican presidential candidate by ushering him into a nearly empty room for what he had been told was a rally.

The legal troubles of a political fundraiser in Nevada has touched political leaders in both major parties, including Sen. Harry Reid, the Senate Majority Leader, and Rep. Dean Heller, a Republican. The fundraiser, Harvey Whittemore, has been accused by former business associates in a lawsuit of embezzlement. Reid and Heller said they have given campaign contributions from Whittemore to charity.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.