The Stump

Santorum's Youngest Daughter Returns To Hospital

Rick Santorum holds his youngest child, Isabella, before announcing his run for the presidency on June 6 in Somerset, Pa. Santorum's campaign announced Friday that Isabella, who was born with trisomy 18, had returned to the hospital. i i

Rick Santorum holds his youngest child, Isabella, before announcing his run for the presidency on June 6 in Somerset, Pa. Santorum's campaign announced Friday that Isabella, who was born with trisomy 18, had returned to the hospital. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jeff Swensen/Getty Images
Rick Santorum holds his youngest child, Isabella, before announcing his run for the presidency on June 6 in Somerset, Pa. Santorum's campaign announced Friday that Isabella, who was born with trisomy 18, had returned to the hospital.

Rick Santorum holds his youngest child, Isabella, before announcing his run for the presidency on June 6 in Somerset, Pa. Santorum's campaign announced Friday that Isabella, who was born with trisomy 18, had returned to the hospital.

Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum's youngest daughter, Isabella, has returned to the hospital. Known as "Bella," the 3-year-old has been battling trisomy 18, a congenital condition similar to Down syndrome, since birth. No details on her current condition were made available.

A statement from Santorum's national communications director Hogan Gidley read:

"Rick and his wife Karen have taken their daughter Bella to the hospital. The family requests prayers and privacy as Bella works her way to recovery."

Santorum had previously planned to take a break from campaigning through the Easter holiday and resume his campaign schedule in Pennsylvania on Monday.

Santorum left the campaign trail for several days in late January when Bella faced a bout of pneumonia linked to her condition. His eldest daughter, Elizabeth, campaigned in his place.

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