The Stump

Tough Night For Self-Financed Senate Candidates

Republican Senate candidate Linda McMahon concedes the election to Democrat Chris Murphy on Tuesday in Stamford, Conn. i i

Republican Senate candidate Linda McMahon concedes the election to Democrat Chris Murphy on Tuesday in Stamford, Conn. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Charles Krupa/AP
Republican Senate candidate Linda McMahon concedes the election to Democrat Chris Murphy on Tuesday in Stamford, Conn.

Republican Senate candidate Linda McMahon concedes the election to Democrat Chris Murphy on Tuesday in Stamford, Conn.

Charles Krupa/AP

This was not such a good night for self-financed Senate candidates.

In Connecticut, three-term Democratic Rep. Chris Murphy beat Republican nominee Linda McMahon, who essentially self-financed her bid at a cost of at least $40 million. She and her husband, Vince — who made their wealth running World Wrestling Entertainment — had already plowed $50 million into a Senate race in 2010.

The net result: McMahon spent about four times as much as Murphy, and her three-year quest for a Senate seat will likely cost close to $100 million — easily a record. Her share of the vote dropped from 2010 to this year.

Less dramatically, Pennsylvania Republican Tom Smith spent more than $16 million of his own cash, hoping to upset incumbent Democrat Bob Casey. There was a week or so when it looked as if Smith might catch Casey by surprise. He spent nearly twice as much as the incumbent, but Casey wound up beating him by a 2-to-1 margin.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.