Faces

Women's Rights Activist Sandra Fluke Aims For Congressional Seat

President Obama is accompanied by Sandra Fluke at a 2012 campaign event in Aurora, Colo. Fluke gained attention when talk show host Rush Limbaugh spoke disparagingly of her testimony before Congress on the issue of contraception and insurance coverage. i i

President Obama is accompanied by Sandra Fluke at a 2012 campaign event in Aurora, Colo. Fluke gained attention when talk show host Rush Limbaugh spoke disparagingly of her testimony before Congress on the issue of contraception and insurance coverage. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
President Obama is accompanied by Sandra Fluke at a 2012 campaign event in Aurora, Colo. Fluke gained attention when talk show host Rush Limbaugh spoke disparagingly of her testimony before Congress on the issue of contraception and insurance coverage.

President Obama is accompanied by Sandra Fluke at a 2012 campaign event in Aurora, Colo. Fluke gained attention when talk show host Rush Limbaugh spoke disparagingly of her testimony before Congress on the issue of contraception and insurance coverage.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Add women's rights activist Sandra Fluke to the roster of Democrats hoping to succeed Rep. Henry Waxman.

Fluke has filed with the California Democratic Party to seek its endorsement for the heavily Democratic Los Angeles-based seat held by Waxman since 1975.

She's listed on the state party's website as one of three candidates who have officially filed in the 33rd Congressional District. The other two are state Sen. Ted Lieu and Wendy Greuel, a finalist in last year's Los Angeles mayoral race.

Abigail Gardner, a spokeswoman for Fluke, confirmed that the activist has filed with the state party but said the move was simply a procedural step to meet internal party deadlines and allow Fluke to keep her options open.

In an interview with KPCC last week, Fluke told the Southern California radio station, "I am strongly considering running."

Waxman announced last week that he will not seek re-election, raising the prospect of a crowded race for a House seat that's been occupied for decades.

Fluke was thrust into the national spotlight after she was denied a chance to testify during a Republican-led House hearing on Obamacare's contraception coverage in 2012. She later testified during a hearing before the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee.

The incident gained even more attention when conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh called Fluke, then a Georgetown law student, a "slut" and a "prostitute" on air.

As a result of her experience, Fluke became a rallying point on the left and was a featured speaker at the Democratic National Convention in 2012, where she spoke about women's rights. Fluke also campaigned for various Democratic candidates and introduced President Obama at a rally in Denver.

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