Isn't That King David? Nope, It's Just Dave

Usually they're naked, ancient and stony. But all of a sudden, they could live next door.

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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani
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Photo and idea conception: Léo Caillard; Retouching: Alexis Persani

The Paris-based designer Leo Caillard had, as he wrote me, "the idea conception" and took the photographs. Alexis Persani dressed them. (Not actually; it was done on a computer, as you can see here. I know that putting modern clothes on classical sculptures isn't a new idea. Michelangelo's David has had "Fridge Fun" modern clothes for years. But the skirts, T-shirts and shorts in these images look so comfortable and fit so well, these ancients torque suddenly into moderns. It's like these two French artists have developed a new way to time travel. Which has me wondering about the reverse possibility: Beyonce, Halle Berry, Leo DiCaprio given drapes, spears and marbleized — could they pass for "ancient" at the Louvre in France?

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