Currency

Dollar Coins In The Wild

Thanks to Planet Money listeners for submitting these photos.

hide captionThanks to Planet Money listeners for submitting these photos.

Jess Jiang/NPR

On today's Planet Money: More on the mountain of dollar coins sitting unused in government vaults.

We talk to self-described 'travel hackers' who use frequent-flier mile credit cards to buy dollar coins and pile up miles.

And we learn that the U.S. Mint — just today! — said it would stop letting people use credit cards to buy the coins.

Money quote from the mint:

The Mint has determined that this policy change is prudent due to ongoing activity by individuals purchasing $1 coins with credit cards, accumulating frequent flyer miles, and then returning coins to local banks.

Also on the show: Why Ecuador loves U.S. dollar coins.

Teacher Rebecca Kayes shows off the dollar coins she uses in Quito, Ecuador. i i

hide captionTeacher Rebecca Kayes shows off the dollar coins she uses in Quito, Ecuador.

Rebecca Kayes
Teacher Rebecca Kayes shows off the dollar coins she uses in Quito, Ecuador.

Teacher Rebecca Kayes shows off the dollar coins she uses in Quito, Ecuador.

Rebecca Kayes

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Planet Money's Wall-To-Wall Dollar Coin Coverage:

$1 Billion That Nobody Wants

How Frequent Fliers Exploit A Government Program To Get Free Trips

Dollar Coin Loophole Closes For Frequent Fliers

Bill Would Kill Dollar Coin Program

Senators Call Dollar Coin Pileup 'Troubling'

Ecuador Needs Your Dollar Coins : Planet Money

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