Jobs

Unemployment In Your State (Cont'd)

There are more than 25 million Americans who are either unemployed or can't find full-time work.

Nationwide, the broader unemployment rate, which tracks this group, is 16.2 percent. But the rate varies widely from state to state, according to the latest numbers from the BLS.

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This is a map of the United States, with each state shaded according to its level of broader unemployment.

Nevada, which is still digging out from the housing bust, had the highest broader unemployment rate at 23.3 percent. California (21.8 percent) and Michigan (19.6 percent) had the second and third highest rates.

North Dakota, with its recent oil boom, had the lowest rate with 7.2 percent. Other states in the mid-west, South Dakota and Nebraska, also had relatively low rates of broader unemployment.

For more:

See our recent maps of state-by-state economic growth and unemployment rates.

Rank State Rate
1 North Dakota 7.2
2 Nebraska 8.4
3 South Dakota 9.8
4 Oklahoma 10.4
5 Wyoming 10.8
6 New Hampshire 11.4
7 Iowa 11.6
8 Vermont 11.8
9 Virginia 11.8
10 Kansas 12.4
11 Maryland 12.6
12 Minnesota 13.5
13 Louisiana 13.6
14 Massachusetts 13.7
15 Alaska 13.8
16 Delaware 14.0
17 Pennsylvania 14.0
18 West Virginia 14.2
19 Texas 14.3
20 Arkansas 14.4
21 Utah 14.4
22 New York 14.7
23 Wisconsin 14.7
24 District of Columbia 14.9
25 Montana 14.9
26 Missouri 15.0
27 New Mexico 15.1
28 Maine 15.6
29 Ohio 15.6
30 Colorado 15.7
31 Hawaii 15.8
32 Connecticut 15.9
33 Indiana 15.9
34 Kentucky 15.9
35 Idaho 16.0
36 Tennessee 16.0
37 New Jersey 16.1
38 Mississippi 16.3
39 Illinois 16.8
40 Alabama 16.9
41 Georgia 17.4
42 North Carolina 17.5
43 Arizona 18.2
44 South Carolina 18.3
45 Florida 18.4
46 Oregon 18.7
47 Washington 18.7
48 Rhode Island 18.8
49 Michigan 19.6
50 California 21.8
51 Nevada 23.3

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