Government

Episode 482: Why The U.S. Keeps Sending Weapons To Egypt

An American F-16 fighter plane arrives at an airbase in Egypt on March 27, 1982.

An American F-16 fighter plane arrives at an airbase in Egypt on March 27, 1982. Foley/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Foley/AP

As the Egyptian military cracked down on protesters last week, U.S.-made Apache helicopters flew overhead. The Egyptian military also uses American made tanks, fighter jets and bullets.

This is the product of the $1.3 billion in military aid the U.S. provides to Egypt every year. In polls, a majority of Egyptians say they want that aid to end. And it's become unpopular among some powerful Americans as well. Yet, so far, the aid hasn't stopped flowing.

On today's show: Why it's so hard for the U.S. to stop sending military aid to Egypt.

Music: Mustafa Kamel's "Tisslam al-Ayady" Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/Spotify/ Tumblr. Download the Planet Money iPhone App.

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