Are You An Ace Of Bass?

photo of winged cat playing bass
Furry Rockers

Here's a joke that you may or may not have already heard:

A guy goes on vacation to a tropical island. As soon as he gets off the plane, he hears drums. From that moment on, everywhere he goes, he continues to hear the drumming: He goes to the beach, he hears drums; he eats lunch, he hears drums; he goes on a hike, he hears drums. When he tries to go to sleep, he hears drums.

This goes on for several nights, and it gets to the point where the guy can't sleep at night because of the drums. Finally, he goes down to his hotel's front desk.

When he gets there, he asks the manager, "Hey! What's with these drums? Don't they ever stop?"

The manager says, "No, the drums must never stop; something very bad will happen if they do."

"What?"

"Bass solo."

Zing!

I've been thinking a lot about bass solos lately, because my friend Patrick has been leaving a series of them on my voice mail. It's as if Les Claypool himself is calling me, serenading me with four heavy strings and a thumb.

YouTube

Then I thought: If one bass solo could make my day, how would I feel after hearing 10 bass solos, or 20? More importantly, how would you feel? I bet you would feel heavy, as in heavily awesome.

So, let's get low. Monitor Mix is holding a BASS SOLO CONTEST! Please send in audio or video of yourself playing a bass solo — it can be an original solo or a cover. The deadline is Friday, May 28th at 5 p.m. PDT. Send your entries to:

monitormix@npr.org

I'll put the top entries on the blog, and we'll put them to a vote. The winning solo will receive some NPR-related prizes, not to mention bragging rights.

Plus, we'll throw in this: A copy of the Superchunk 7" "Crossed Wires" autographed by bass player Laura Ballance. By the way, Superchunk is going on tour! (And check out this video for Superchunk's "Cast Iron"/"The First Part.")

Please read the NPR Terms of Use before you enter the contest. Or, just watch this video about orphaned sloths.

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