Comics

Comic-Con: The Post-Mortem

Marvelman

A battle over Marvelman has been resolved. Marvel Comics hide caption

itoggle caption Marvel Comics

And so, as the sun sinks slowly into the Weird Western Tales back issue bin, we bid a fond farewell to another Comic-Con.

Last week, the geeks descended on San Diego like a forgotten plague of Egypt ("And lo, there shall come long lines of sweaty chunky dudes whose attitude toward deodorizing balms could best be described as ambivalent").

They came, they saw, they whinged about the influx of Twilight fans screaming over Robert Pattinson. (Which development prompted geek-adjacent comedian Paul F. Tompkins to sagely opine, via Twitter: "Listen, nerds: you are living a graphic novel called GLASS HOUSES.")

And somewhere between all the movie trailers and drinking and television pilots and drinking and video game announcements and drinking, they talked about what's new and noteworthy in comic books.

After the jump: A small sample of the comics news from Comic-Con, and why you should care.

The News:
Marvel Comics has acquired the rights to Marvelman.

Why You, Non-Comics-Geek, Should Care:
Details are still hazy, but the bottom line is that a character who's been the subject of pitched legal battles for decades will once again see the light of day. Whether or not those comics might include Alan Moore's much discussed but little-seen '80s deconstruction of the character — again, details hazy; ask again later.

Who is Marvelman, how did he come to be, and just where's he been all this time? That's a long and litigious story. If you're curious, here's a handy and comprehensive precis from the fine folks at Blog@Newsarama.com.

The News:
We'll be getting more of Jeff Smith's Bone.

Why You, Non-Comics-Geek, Should Care:
Bone, Smith's gorgeous/funny/freaking huge all-ages epic, concluded a few years back. Next year he'll release a new collection of one-off tales, both old and new. (He also announced that another author will pen a series of novels based on Smith's characters. A wait-and-see approach seems advisable.)

The News:
Writer Neil Kleid's and artist Nicolas Cinquegrani's The Big Kahn is due out at the end of the month.

Why You, Non-Comics-Geek, Should Care:
Smart people who've seen the book — about a rabbi's family that discovers, upon his death, that he wasn't Jewish — are talking it up like crazy. Here's a preview, from Publishers Weekly.

The News:
David Mazzucchelli's Asterios Polyp is a great book, you guys, seriously.

Why You, Non-Comics-Geek, Should Care:
Because David Mazzuchelli's Asterios Polyp is a great book, you guys, seriously. The Los Angeles Times thinks so. The Village Voice thinks so. The New York Times thinks so — at least I'm pretty sure it does:

The book is a satirical comedy of remarriage, a treatise on aesthetics and design and ontology, a late-life Kunstlerroman, a Novel of Ideas with two capital letters, and just about the most schematic work of fiction this side of that other big book that constantly alludes to the "Odyssey."

So, uh, yeah.

The News:
Comics are coming to your cell phone in a big way. Lots of providers, lots of apps, a wider selection of titles.

Why You, Non-Comics-Geek, Should Care:
Because you're getting just a little bit sick of Peggle, now, aren't you?

The News:
The Weekly World News, which went online-only last year, will make its return to the printed page in a comic book published by IDW.

Why You, Non-Comics-Geek, Should Care:
Because the comics page is the ideal home for WWN's own Justice-League roster of weirdness: the elusive Bat-Boy, the xenophobic master-ranter Ed Anger, and everyone's favorite uptight agony aunt, Dear Dottie. (UPDATED: Okay, maybe not Dear Dottie.)

The News:
Jennifer Love Hewitt's gonna launch a comic book. About a possessed music box. Cough.

Why You, Non-Comics-Geek, Should Care:
You shouldn't. Oh good gravy, how you really, really shouldn't.

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