Awards Season

Globe Nominees: It's The Usual Muddle

The cast of Fox's Glee. i i

Glee brought in four nominations for Fox when this morning's Golden Globe nominations were announced. Fox hide caption

itoggle caption Fox
The cast of Fox's Glee.

Glee brought in four nominations for Fox when this morning's Golden Globe nominations were announced.

Fox

The Golden Globe nominations are out this morning for both movies and television, and as usual, they represent a rather perplexing mix. As odd as the Oscars and Emmys are, the Golden Globes are often even stranger, and while this year's nominations are head-scratchers in some cases, this isn't a set of awards you want to get too annoyed about. The Globes are always a little nutty; they're a good fit for this year's host, Ricky Gervais, and for the best-known Globes tradition of all: people having way too much to drink during the ceremony.

Double nominees, non-nominees, and Diane Kruger puts her foot in her mouth, after the jump.

Movie Nominations

In what's rapidly becoming a trend, Up In The Air did very well — it's nominated for Best Drama, George Clooney is nominated, supporting actresses Vera Farmiga and Anna Kendrick are both nominated, the director Jason Reitman is nominated, and his screenplay is nominated.

Invictus, meanwhile, pulled off the perplexing feat of not being nominated at the Best Drama level, but having its director and actors (Matt Damon and Morgan Freeman) nominated.

Perhaps the closest thing to a surprise — and it's not really surprising so much as noteworthy — in the big movie categories is that James Cameron's Avatar is nominated for Best Drama. This hasn't been a major player in the awards that have been handed out thus far by various circles of critics, but it's important to keep in mind that the Globes love this kind of big, popular, ambitious audience bait.

As many expected, Meryl Streep was double-nominated in the same category — actress in a comedy/musical — for her roles in It's Complicated and Julie & Julia. As formidable as Streep is, this does seem like it's also a symptom of what a weak year it was in good roles for women, particularly in comedies. (See also: the fact that her category includes Julia Roberts in Duplicity, certainly a likable movie but nothing that would be awards material in a better year, and Sandra Bullock in The Proposal, which: likewise.)

Other double nominees include Bullock (also nominated for The Blind Side over in drama) and Matt Damon (for Invictus and The Informant!).

One of the films people are watching closely this year to see if there's any chance it could sneak into some awards recognition is The Hangover — note that it was nominated for Best Comedy/Musical, but that's the only recognition it received. Compare that to the comedy It's Complicated, for instance, which not only received Streep's nomination but one for the Nancy Meyers screenplay. Meyers, also the writer of films like The Holiday and Something's Gotta Give as well as the updates of Father Of The Bride and The Parent Trap, doesn't exactly have an extensive history of award-winning; the fact that she got the only nomination given to a comedy screenplay seems ... well, as stated earlier, the Globes can be a bit perplexing. (Full disclosure: Haven't seen It's Complicated yet; just going by expectations versus reality.)

Television Nominations

There are no real surprises among the drama series nominations, where Mad Men, Dexter, True Blood and Big Love are representing cable and House is the sole broadcast nominee. (It's a bit of a surprise that AMC's Breaking Bad isn't here, but it's hard to find one of the nominees to really vociferously argue with, either.)

CBS landed acting nods for Julianna Margulies from The Good Wife and Simon Baker for The Mentalist, and Hugh Laurie added a Best Actor In A Drama nomination for House on Fox, but NBC and ABC are shut out of the big drama categories, which has to be a little sobering. (NBC partially has itself to blame, but the ongoing apparent awards boycott of Friday Night Lights is utterly inexplicable.)

A Mad Men note: For the second year in a row, January Jones was nominated for Mad Men and Elisabeth Moss wasn't. While I'm a Jones fan and defender, leaving out Elisabeth Moss seems symptomatic of a certain lack of imagination regarding performances that contain fewer histrionics but just as much depth.

Comedies were kinder to both ABC and NBC: ABC has Modern Family among the comedy series nominees, and NBC (unsurprisingly) has both The Office and 30 Rock. Glee did very well for Fox, bringing in nominations for comedy series as well as acting nominations for Lea Michele, Matthew Morrison and Jane Lynch.

CBS, meanwhile, suffered the snub of its The Big Bang Theory, which is both very popular right now and very good right now, and while most of the comedy nominations seem worthwhile, the fact that HBO's fading Entourage is hogging a spot for another year when Big Bang is exactly the kind of show the Globes usually find room for is very disappointing.

Lynch's Glee nomination, of course, is in the always bizarre Supporting Actress In Absolutely Anything category (not its official name), where she is up against, among others, Chloe Sevigny for Big Love. It doesn't get more apples-and-oranges than that — except maybe on the Supporting Actor side, where Neil Patrick Harris of How I Met Your Mother faces Michael Emerson of Lost.

A final note: One of the most interesting things about the Golden Globes is that they combine television and film in one set of awards, which led to the most awkward moment in this morning's nominations announcement. Presenter Diane Kruger, a film actress (from, among other things, Inglourious Basterds) announced the shift from her television categories to her movie categories by rubbing her hands together and saying, "Okay, let's get serious." Yes, her television nominations were in comedy, but people who work in comedy are proud of their work also, and her attitude of "And now for the ones that matter" was unmistakable. She's going to want that one back when she sees how it looked.

Check out the full list of nominations here.

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