Roundups

Morning Shots: Theatrical Smoking, Bad Wedding Dancers, And A 'Chuck' Poster

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• The Colorado Supreme Court has ruled that a state public smoking ban applies to smoking as part of a theatrical production. Dangerous greasers and those down on their luck will just have to rely on swilling bogus alcohol.

• Check out this research on "dance confidence" reported in The Guardian from Dr. Peter Lovatt, known as "Dr. Dance." And then ponder what sort of crossed signals led to The Telegraph calling what certainly seems to be the same person "Dr. Peter Dad," perhaps confused by their own reference to "dad dancing." COPY! (Also great: the argument that uncoordinated older men at weddings are trying to ward off the young women who would otherwise be clamoring to have offspring with them. If this is true, it is kind of great. Way to go, nature!)

• I have a lot of fun at the expense of NBC, but I give full credit for this promotional poster for the new season of Chuck, which does a great job of capturing both what made the first two seasons (especially the second one) so good and what seems to be on the horizon for the third season, without giving away much that hasn't already been said.

• Do you listen to the radio? Of course you do. Over at The New York Times, there's some news about changes in radio ratings since they switched from diaries to meters (in other words, tracking actual listening rather than asking people to report their habits later, just as was eventually done with television ratings). Attention, soft-rock aficionados: consider yourselves busted.

How big movies have to be to make money, a Beardy update, and a look at soaps down the nose of a former editor, after the jump.

• I enjoyed this piece at The Wrap, which stresses that when you hear box-office numbers, it's critical to keep in mind that some kinds of movies have to become enormous, massive, world-crushing hits in order to be financially successful at all.

• Former soap magazine editor Taffy Brodesser-Akner would like you to know that she hopes soap actors are able to rise above their miserable jobs in soaps, just as she rose above her miserable job as a soap-related editor. This piece would have been more interesting if it had actually been about "Who's Killing Soaps?" the way it says it is. (Note to Taffy: I think actors who work as steadily as soap actors do for as long as they do are often not quite as unhappy as you think. Not everybody is crushed over not being seated at restaurants ahead of Wil Wheaton when they've had regular acting work for, say, 20 years.)

• Were you a fan of Kevin "Beardy" Gillespie on this season's Top Chef? Pop Candy's Whitney Matheson, the hardest-working woman in the pop-culture business, has a chat with him in which he discusses his tattoos, his restaurant, and (aw) his pending divorce.

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