Roundups

Morning Shots: The '80s Return, Reading And Boredom, And The Torn Picasso

cup of coffee.
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The Times makes a pretty sound argument that the return of the 1980s in cinema has gotten totally out of control. I either didn't know, or had more likely blocked out, that they were planning a remake of Short Circuit, for instance.

• Two interesting books pieces in The New York Times: one on why literary critics hardly ever admit that a book is boring, and one on whether reading socially makes you less of a reader. I have to say, of all the genres of fret writing currently circulating in the arts world, I find the "Are People Reading Correctly?" essay is the most perplexing.

• Now, this would be embarrassing. You know the horrible nightmare where you're at the museum, and you trip and fall, and you wind up putting your hand through a Picasso? Happened to this lady. Unfortunately, she was wide awake.

Good news for print, a new way to measure viewers, and how Spartacus went over, after the jump.

• Since almost every day brings new news of the "so long, print, it was nice knowing you" variety, please consider: at least some women's magazines are seeing an uptick in advertising. In print!

• The energetically, amusingly bad Spartacus: Blood And Sand premiered to decent ratings on Starz. Maybe it was all the sex and violence.

• Nielsen continues its probably-doomed efforts to come up with a comprehensive way to figure out how many people actually watch a particular television show — in all the various ways that can be accomplished.

• I find myself rooting for Josh Radnor, whose work on How I Met Your Mother I think is more important and better than he generally gets credit for. So I've been intrigued to see some nice mentions of his film happythankyoumoreplease at Sundance. For lots more about Sundance from Monkey See's own Ella Taylor, make sure you check out her Sundance diary entries.

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