Roundups

Morning Shots: The Ebert Profile, Eubanks Quits, And Beyonce's Underwear Dispute

cup of coffee.
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• I am duplicating much of the Internet chatter of yesterday here, but I don't care: if you, by any chance, missed Esquire's extraordinary profile of Roger Ebert, I would plead with you to read it. It's sharply written, tells a remarkable story about avoiding self-pity, and manages as a side note to also serve as a tribute to Gene Siskel and the work the two men did together. Fantastic read.

• NPR Music has a discussion of the decision to remove live performances of Best Original Song nominees from the Oscar telecast.

• I'm not sure whether it's a sign of trouble that Kevin Eubanks is leaving Jay Leno's side as Leno returns to The Tonight Show, but it's going to mean the show won't be restored in quite the state it was in when Leno originally left.

• Two interesting inside-media stories from Gawker: a battle at The New York Times over control of their iPad application and its deployment, and a contract between the AP and Yahoo! Finance that is allegedly forcing AP's business desk to sacrifice quality for quantity.

Copyrighted underwear, the departure of a 27-year acting veteran, and James Cameron just keeps going, after the jump.

This will probably be the only news item about Beyonce you read all day that will include the term "copyrighted underwear."

• More sad news for soap lovers, as if they needed more: All My Children's enormously talented and very long-running actor David Canary, who has played Adam Chandler (and his brother Stuart) since 1983 — that's 27 years ago, folks — is retiring. (It's really only on soaps that you ever see an actor play the same role week in and week out for 27 years, so nobody except a soap fan really knows what these announcements are like.)

• The next chapter in the battle between Redbox and the major studios over distribution of DVDs at Redbox kiosks didn't go well for the kiosk company and its users.

• James Cameron is writing a novel that will serve as a prequel to Avatar. No word on whether things will come right out of the book and smack you in the face.

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