Roundups

Morning Shots: 'The Karate Kid,' Donald Trump, And Other Punchables

cup of coffee.
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• You know, one of the things I like about Slashfilm is that they have the ability to cover movies in a way that's accessible, conversational, and informed, that doesn't sound like they're trying to impress anyone with how insider-y they are. Case in point: This early look at The Karate Kid remake. That's a fairly anticipated movie, and it's also a massive target for anyone who, having seen it, wants to write a "this movie is terrible" hit piece. Note the restraint.

• If you love businesses yelling at each other, you'll love the story of how 3D screens have become such prized real estate that arm-twisting tactics are increasing in order to force theater owners to make certain choices about how to allocate them.

• Betty White overload? Don't care. She still rules. "The luckiest old broad who ever drew breath"? Yeah, being awesome will do that for you.

Trump, Amazon, and more, after the jump.

• In news of people who are significantly less awesome, NBC is apparently bringing back the regular version of The Apprentice — which has been on hiatus since they started doing celebrity versions. Donald Trump's conviction that this has something to do with helping the economy is either tragic or hilarious, much like everything else relating to Donald Trump.

• I didn't even know IGN was supposed to be for men, let alone young men, let alone young men who are gamers. I just thought it was a solid site to read about television, because that's the section I read. If that goes away, that will be a shame.

• Pardon me while I paraphrase this piece about Amazon, Apple, and e-books: Nobody knows what's going to happen yet, and nobody wants to be on the bad end of the deal once the electronic book market shakes out. Just understand that, going forward.

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