Roundups

Morning Shots: Writing From Manuals, Dixie Carter, And Activision

cup of coffee.
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Here's an interesting addition to the ongoing War Between Books And E-Books. It's interesting because she's distinguishing paper books from the iPad, whereas I would actually use some of these same arguments in favor of the Kindle over the iPad.

• You know, in this piece about Dixie Carter and how great she was, the writer comes within an inch of saying, "I was a snob about the fact that she was on television, and I should not have been," and then it pulls back at the last minute and says, in effect, "Dixie Carter made me underestimate her by doing television, and it was her own fault." A sadly missed opportunity to learn something. But still a lovely tribute.

• An essay in The Atlantic takes the position that you don't learn to write from reading manuals on how to write. Not an especially daring thesis, but it's explained quite well. (Hat-tip to Bookninja.)

After the jump: No Doubt goes to court, Burn Notice keeps going, and George Clooney carries a gun.

• Did you know that No Doubt is currently in a legal dispute with Activision over the appropriate use of avatars of band members in the game Band Hero? Or that Activision has invoked the First Amendment? Now you know.

• USA's delightful Burn Notice has been renewed for both a fifth season and a sixth — good to get everybody's plans in order early, I suppose.

• An interesting, and very brief, roundup of which shows have done better, worse, and much worse than last season. (Did you know the formidable CSI was down more than 20 percent in total viewers?)

• There is a newly released photo of George Clooney running with a gun in his upcoming movie The American. This adds to a previously released photo of George Clooney standing with a gun. Tantalizing!

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