Roundups

Morning Shots: Neil Gaiman, Michael Jackson and ... 'Til Death'? Really?

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You will be shocked — shocked! — to learn that death was an excellent financial move for Michael Jackson.

The Onion A.V. Club has this masterful takedown/appreciation of 'Til Death, a show that nobody watched and even fewer people liked. It's a pretty fascinating examination of how being spectacularly terrible can be wildly liberating for creative types who might then take wild chances that would never be possible if they were merely bad. It doesn't go so far as to say that it made the show any better, however.

Andy Rooney plans on dying on camera, and there is nothing you can do about it.

Here is a list of recordings that finds space for 2Pac's "Dear Mama," Abe Elenkrig's Yidishe Orchestra, Loretta Lynn's "Coal Miner's Daughter," R.E.M.'s "Radio Free Europe" and Marine field recordings from the Second Battle of Guam (July 20 - August 11, 1944), all side by side. What do they have in common? They are now bound together as the latest selections for the Library Of Congress's National Recording Registry, just as God intended.

One commentator's take on Neil Gaiman's recent plea for both good writing and good stories, which should resonate with anybody who took a side in the "It's always been about character development!"/"Then what was that whole island-jumping-through-time thing about, huh?" Lost-finale debate. Which you are forbidden from restarting in the comments. Forbidden!

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