Roundups

Morning Shots: Bugs Bunny, Tinkerbell, Moppets, Pitchfork, And The Hulk

a cup of coffee
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Bookninja comments on a piece decrying the emergence of &#$% My [Blank] [Blanked] books. It's probably too late to be bothered by the bookifying of absolutely every whimsical blog idea anyone has ever had, but if it weren't, I'd argue that's the real problem.

This very interesting article in The New York Times argues that Pitchfork, which considers itself Fonzie, is actually becoming Mr. C. (This uproariously generationally inappropriate metaphor brought to you by my aging bones.)

Bugs Bunny and the Hollywood Bowl: a match made in heaven.

Casting news, part the first: A live-action Tinkerbell movie (called ... Tink) will star Elizabeth Banks. I'm not quite as down on Adam Shankman as Adam Quigley at Slashfilm is, but I admit that there are many ways this could go horribly wrong.

Casting news, part the second: Amber Tamblyn becomes the next young woman to undoubtedly find herself held in contempt by House on House.

Casting news, part the third: Lost in some of the hubbub over the 100 percent Edward-Norton-free The Avengers was the fact that whether dismissing Edward Norton wound up creating major problems or not might depend on who wound up with the role instead. While it all still seems to be in the "rumor has it that discussions are taking place" stage, the latest rumors surround Mark Ruffalo.

It's a little nerve-racking to hear the word "Pixar" close to the words "direct to DVD," but "Movieline hears" that there may be a direct-to-DVD sequel to Cars, called Planes. This could be the beginning of kind of quite a franchise. Dirigibles! Carriages! Trolleys! Monorails!

And speaking of Pixar, consider with caution reports that Tim Allen is already signed for a possible Toy Story 4.

Today in happy and not very surprising news: one new study suggests that singing is good for little kids.

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